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6 Things to Consider Before Starting a Wedding Diet

6 Things to Consider Before Starting a Wedding Diet


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Of course every bride wants to look beautiful in her wedding dress. It’s the one day in her life where she gets to dress up and be treated like a princess. A camera will be pointed at her for the entirety of the wedding ceremony and wedding reception, and these photos are ones she’ll cherish forever and ever, so obviously she wants to look perfect in them all.

Most brides put themselves through a pre-wedding diet — to various degrees of intensity — to get ready for their fairytale day. A healthy wedding diet that will leave her looking fit, well, and happy on the big day is what every bride dreams of. No bride, however, dreams of putting on her wedding dress and looking ill, stressed, and exhausted, because her diet was far too extreme.

Before starting a wedding diet, there are six things you need to consider, to be sure that this part of your wedding preparation goes without any hitches:

Allow Yourself Enough Time

If you want to lose weight before your wedding, don’t leave it until two weeks before. Depending on how much weight you want to lose, allow yourself at least one or two months to reach your target. This will allow you to lose weight healthily and safely, enabling you to gain muscle, and lose the fat. Last minute crash diets will stress you and your body out, and will probably leave you ill, panicky, and depleted of energy, making you look like a very unhealthy bride.

Buy a Dress That Fits

You’ve probably found the perfect dress a little while before your wedding. As soon as the engagement ring is on your finger, it’s hard to resist starting the hunt for a dress of your dreams. But make sure you don’t buy that dress of your dreams in two sizes smaller than actually fits you. You may well lose weight before the wedding, but buying a dress that looks like it has been made to fit a Barbie doll is not worth the endless stress you’ll put yourself under as you have repetitive nightmares about not being able to button it up on your wedding day. Anyway, the tailor will find it much easier to reduce the size of your dress by a size the week before the wedding if necessary, than to increase it two sizes the day of.

Don’t Be Too Strict on Yourself

If your wedding is in May, and as soon as Christmas is over you tell yourself that you’re going to start your wedding diet now by giving up all sugar until you eat a slice of your wedding cake, you’re setting yourself up for failure. Setting unrealistically strict rules such as “absolutely no chocolate,” will only make you crave what you have given up even more. Rather than giving yourself rigid rules, allow yourself some flexibility; make sure you treat yourself to your biggest, unhealthiest weakness every now and again, and the whole dieting process will be much easier, and much more successful.

Prioritize Exercising and Healthy Eating

The months leading up to your wedding are likely to be some the busiest of your life. You’re essentially doing two full-time jobs: your regular one, and that of a wedding planner. It’s easy in this hectic period to convince yourself that you simply don’t have time to worry about what you’re eating, or you’re exercise regime. Unsurprisingly, not prioritizing healthy eating and regular exercise means your wedding diet is not going to work. Put these two things at the top of your daily to-do lists, make a habit of them, and we promise the planning and your actual job won’t suffer as a result.

Set Your Targets

Before you start your diet, it’s important to set yourself some clear targets. And these targets have to be realistic ones. Once you’ve decided what they are and what your sensible timeline is, it’s time to get started. But you also need to remember to stop when you reach the target. Don’t be tempted to carry on: Yes you should continue to exercise and eat healthily, but stop shedding all those pounds. Enough is enough.

Skip the Diet Pills

Diet pills may sound like the perfect easy solution to a beautiful wedding day body, but don’t be tempted. Most diet pills contain a lot of caffeine, which will make you feel on-edge and nervous, as well as stopping you from getting a good night’s sleep. An exhausted, edgy bride-to-be is not what any pre-wedding diet should cause.


6 Things to Know When Setting up a Wedding Registry

Y ou&rsquore full of hopes and dreams of building your lives together, but before you and your fiancé grab the scanner and head down the aisles to create a wish list for a wedding registry, here are a few do&rsquos and don&rsquots to consider.

1 . Don&rsquot forget to register. There&rsquos a lot going on in the wedding process, but Jo Anne Hewlett of Make a Memory Event Planning in Newark says registering for gifts is something that shouldn&rsquot slip through the cracks. If the couple doesn&rsquot live together or is just setting up a household, it&rsquos even more important. &ldquoPlus the guys really like it,&rdquo Hewlett says with a laugh, referring to the scan gun they get to use. But don&rsquot get too scan-happy your first time through the store. A 20-page registry can be daunting. Keep in mind that registries are not a once-and-done thing. Check your registry regularly and update it as needed. If you notice everything under $100 is gone and nothing over $100 has been purchased, replenish the lower-price items only.

2 . Don&rsquot forget to research your registry. According to wedding planner Nicole Bailey of Elevee Events in Rehoboth Beach, most brides know where they want to register because it&rsquos where they shop. Even if you&rsquore familiar with the store, you&rsquoll still want to verify what its policies are. Suzanne Edgar of Everything But the Kitchen Sink in Hockessin suggests you find out if the store delivers, charges extra for shipping or provides gift-wrapping services. Ask questions. The people in the store are professionals and want to help you. &ldquoRegistries are so easy,&rdquo Bailey says.

3 . Don&rsquot register for items you don&rsquot want. It seems obvious, but wedding traditions can be hard to break. Just because your fiancé&rsquos great aunt says fine china is a must-have, you aren&rsquot required to pick out a set. Every couple is different. Many brides today are older and moreestablished.Some have been marriedbefore, and others are just starting out. Hewlett also recommends thinking long term. You&rsquoll keep a lot of these gifts forever. You should consider a set of sterling-silver flatware or solid wood salad bowls. Register for what is right for you todayand down the road as well.

4 . Do look for alternatives. If fine china isn&rsquot right for you, Bailey suggests you pick out something of equal value, such as a set of crystal bourbon snifters. If you already have bath towels, consider replacing bed sheets or your second-hand frying pan. There are websites that allow wedding guests to donate to a charity of your choice. Hewlett advises you also think outside the box. While you should never ask outright for cash, there are websites where guests can help fund your honeymoon or contribute to a down payment on a house. Let your guests give you experiences on your honeymoon like a photographer for the day or a parasailing excursion.

5 . Do register for multiple-price points. Your guests are likely to be a diverse group of people with a range of incomes, and you&rsquoll want to give them options. Some guests like to buy several smaller gifts to give together, and sometimes people will join in to buy a higher ticket item. Edgarrecommends you register for items from$1 to a few that are several hundred dollars. &ldquoIt&rsquos a big wish list,&rdquo she says. &ldquoIt&rsquos one of the few times in your life where you get to say, &lsquoI want this and I want this and I want this.&rsquo&rdquo

6 . Do consider your guests. Though traditionally expected, no one is obligated to buy you a gift. Be mindful of the thoughts and feelings of your friends and families. While guests might find it charming to help fund the honeymoon for a couple who is just starting out, they might be offended if you&rsquore hosting a wedding with a six-figure price tag. If your in-laws are vegetarians, don&rsquot register for the deluxe chicken rotisserie. What is a high-priced item on one registry may not break the bank on another. Even though your registry is a wish list, you want to consider how much you are asking guests to spend. For instance, if you&rsquore having a destination wedding, factor in the cost of getting to the location. Says Bailey, &ldquoWe all know what our families can and cannot afford.&rdquo


6 Things to Know When Setting up a Wedding Registry

Y ou&rsquore full of hopes and dreams of building your lives together, but before you and your fiancé grab the scanner and head down the aisles to create a wish list for a wedding registry, here are a few do&rsquos and don&rsquots to consider.

1 . Don&rsquot forget to register. There&rsquos a lot going on in the wedding process, but Jo Anne Hewlett of Make a Memory Event Planning in Newark says registering for gifts is something that shouldn&rsquot slip through the cracks. If the couple doesn&rsquot live together or is just setting up a household, it&rsquos even more important. &ldquoPlus the guys really like it,&rdquo Hewlett says with a laugh, referring to the scan gun they get to use. But don&rsquot get too scan-happy your first time through the store. A 20-page registry can be daunting. Keep in mind that registries are not a once-and-done thing. Check your registry regularly and update it as needed. If you notice everything under $100 is gone and nothing over $100 has been purchased, replenish the lower-price items only.

2 . Don&rsquot forget to research your registry. According to wedding planner Nicole Bailey of Elevee Events in Rehoboth Beach, most brides know where they want to register because it&rsquos where they shop. Even if you&rsquore familiar with the store, you&rsquoll still want to verify what its policies are. Suzanne Edgar of Everything But the Kitchen Sink in Hockessin suggests you find out if the store delivers, charges extra for shipping or provides gift-wrapping services. Ask questions. The people in the store are professionals and want to help you. &ldquoRegistries are so easy,&rdquo Bailey says.

3 . Don&rsquot register for items you don&rsquot want. It seems obvious, but wedding traditions can be hard to break. Just because your fiancé&rsquos great aunt says fine china is a must-have, you aren&rsquot required to pick out a set. Every couple is different. Many brides today are older and moreestablished.Some have been marriedbefore, and others are just starting out. Hewlett also recommends thinking long term. You&rsquoll keep a lot of these gifts forever. You should consider a set of sterling-silver flatware or solid wood salad bowls. Register for what is right for you todayand down the road as well.

4 . Do look for alternatives. If fine china isn&rsquot right for you, Bailey suggests you pick out something of equal value, such as a set of crystal bourbon snifters. If you already have bath towels, consider replacing bed sheets or your second-hand frying pan. There are websites that allow wedding guests to donate to a charity of your choice. Hewlett advises you also think outside the box. While you should never ask outright for cash, there are websites where guests can help fund your honeymoon or contribute to a down payment on a house. Let your guests give you experiences on your honeymoon like a photographer for the day or a parasailing excursion.

5 . Do register for multiple-price points. Your guests are likely to be a diverse group of people with a range of incomes, and you&rsquoll want to give them options. Some guests like to buy several smaller gifts to give together, and sometimes people will join in to buy a higher ticket item. Edgarrecommends you register for items from$1 to a few that are several hundred dollars. &ldquoIt&rsquos a big wish list,&rdquo she says. &ldquoIt&rsquos one of the few times in your life where you get to say, &lsquoI want this and I want this and I want this.&rsquo&rdquo

6 . Do consider your guests. Though traditionally expected, no one is obligated to buy you a gift. Be mindful of the thoughts and feelings of your friends and families. While guests might find it charming to help fund the honeymoon for a couple who is just starting out, they might be offended if you&rsquore hosting a wedding with a six-figure price tag. If your in-laws are vegetarians, don&rsquot register for the deluxe chicken rotisserie. What is a high-priced item on one registry may not break the bank on another. Even though your registry is a wish list, you want to consider how much you are asking guests to spend. For instance, if you&rsquore having a destination wedding, factor in the cost of getting to the location. Says Bailey, &ldquoWe all know what our families can and cannot afford.&rdquo


6 Things to Know When Setting up a Wedding Registry

Y ou&rsquore full of hopes and dreams of building your lives together, but before you and your fiancé grab the scanner and head down the aisles to create a wish list for a wedding registry, here are a few do&rsquos and don&rsquots to consider.

1 . Don&rsquot forget to register. There&rsquos a lot going on in the wedding process, but Jo Anne Hewlett of Make a Memory Event Planning in Newark says registering for gifts is something that shouldn&rsquot slip through the cracks. If the couple doesn&rsquot live together or is just setting up a household, it&rsquos even more important. &ldquoPlus the guys really like it,&rdquo Hewlett says with a laugh, referring to the scan gun they get to use. But don&rsquot get too scan-happy your first time through the store. A 20-page registry can be daunting. Keep in mind that registries are not a once-and-done thing. Check your registry regularly and update it as needed. If you notice everything under $100 is gone and nothing over $100 has been purchased, replenish the lower-price items only.

2 . Don&rsquot forget to research your registry. According to wedding planner Nicole Bailey of Elevee Events in Rehoboth Beach, most brides know where they want to register because it&rsquos where they shop. Even if you&rsquore familiar with the store, you&rsquoll still want to verify what its policies are. Suzanne Edgar of Everything But the Kitchen Sink in Hockessin suggests you find out if the store delivers, charges extra for shipping or provides gift-wrapping services. Ask questions. The people in the store are professionals and want to help you. &ldquoRegistries are so easy,&rdquo Bailey says.

3 . Don&rsquot register for items you don&rsquot want. It seems obvious, but wedding traditions can be hard to break. Just because your fiancé&rsquos great aunt says fine china is a must-have, you aren&rsquot required to pick out a set. Every couple is different. Many brides today are older and moreestablished.Some have been marriedbefore, and others are just starting out. Hewlett also recommends thinking long term. You&rsquoll keep a lot of these gifts forever. You should consider a set of sterling-silver flatware or solid wood salad bowls. Register for what is right for you todayand down the road as well.

4 . Do look for alternatives. If fine china isn&rsquot right for you, Bailey suggests you pick out something of equal value, such as a set of crystal bourbon snifters. If you already have bath towels, consider replacing bed sheets or your second-hand frying pan. There are websites that allow wedding guests to donate to a charity of your choice. Hewlett advises you also think outside the box. While you should never ask outright for cash, there are websites where guests can help fund your honeymoon or contribute to a down payment on a house. Let your guests give you experiences on your honeymoon like a photographer for the day or a parasailing excursion.

5 . Do register for multiple-price points. Your guests are likely to be a diverse group of people with a range of incomes, and you&rsquoll want to give them options. Some guests like to buy several smaller gifts to give together, and sometimes people will join in to buy a higher ticket item. Edgarrecommends you register for items from$1 to a few that are several hundred dollars. &ldquoIt&rsquos a big wish list,&rdquo she says. &ldquoIt&rsquos one of the few times in your life where you get to say, &lsquoI want this and I want this and I want this.&rsquo&rdquo

6 . Do consider your guests. Though traditionally expected, no one is obligated to buy you a gift. Be mindful of the thoughts and feelings of your friends and families. While guests might find it charming to help fund the honeymoon for a couple who is just starting out, they might be offended if you&rsquore hosting a wedding with a six-figure price tag. If your in-laws are vegetarians, don&rsquot register for the deluxe chicken rotisserie. What is a high-priced item on one registry may not break the bank on another. Even though your registry is a wish list, you want to consider how much you are asking guests to spend. For instance, if you&rsquore having a destination wedding, factor in the cost of getting to the location. Says Bailey, &ldquoWe all know what our families can and cannot afford.&rdquo


6 Things to Know When Setting up a Wedding Registry

Y ou&rsquore full of hopes and dreams of building your lives together, but before you and your fiancé grab the scanner and head down the aisles to create a wish list for a wedding registry, here are a few do&rsquos and don&rsquots to consider.

1 . Don&rsquot forget to register. There&rsquos a lot going on in the wedding process, but Jo Anne Hewlett of Make a Memory Event Planning in Newark says registering for gifts is something that shouldn&rsquot slip through the cracks. If the couple doesn&rsquot live together or is just setting up a household, it&rsquos even more important. &ldquoPlus the guys really like it,&rdquo Hewlett says with a laugh, referring to the scan gun they get to use. But don&rsquot get too scan-happy your first time through the store. A 20-page registry can be daunting. Keep in mind that registries are not a once-and-done thing. Check your registry regularly and update it as needed. If you notice everything under $100 is gone and nothing over $100 has been purchased, replenish the lower-price items only.

2 . Don&rsquot forget to research your registry. According to wedding planner Nicole Bailey of Elevee Events in Rehoboth Beach, most brides know where they want to register because it&rsquos where they shop. Even if you&rsquore familiar with the store, you&rsquoll still want to verify what its policies are. Suzanne Edgar of Everything But the Kitchen Sink in Hockessin suggests you find out if the store delivers, charges extra for shipping or provides gift-wrapping services. Ask questions. The people in the store are professionals and want to help you. &ldquoRegistries are so easy,&rdquo Bailey says.

3 . Don&rsquot register for items you don&rsquot want. It seems obvious, but wedding traditions can be hard to break. Just because your fiancé&rsquos great aunt says fine china is a must-have, you aren&rsquot required to pick out a set. Every couple is different. Many brides today are older and moreestablished.Some have been marriedbefore, and others are just starting out. Hewlett also recommends thinking long term. You&rsquoll keep a lot of these gifts forever. You should consider a set of sterling-silver flatware or solid wood salad bowls. Register for what is right for you todayand down the road as well.

4 . Do look for alternatives. If fine china isn&rsquot right for you, Bailey suggests you pick out something of equal value, such as a set of crystal bourbon snifters. If you already have bath towels, consider replacing bed sheets or your second-hand frying pan. There are websites that allow wedding guests to donate to a charity of your choice. Hewlett advises you also think outside the box. While you should never ask outright for cash, there are websites where guests can help fund your honeymoon or contribute to a down payment on a house. Let your guests give you experiences on your honeymoon like a photographer for the day or a parasailing excursion.

5 . Do register for multiple-price points. Your guests are likely to be a diverse group of people with a range of incomes, and you&rsquoll want to give them options. Some guests like to buy several smaller gifts to give together, and sometimes people will join in to buy a higher ticket item. Edgarrecommends you register for items from$1 to a few that are several hundred dollars. &ldquoIt&rsquos a big wish list,&rdquo she says. &ldquoIt&rsquos one of the few times in your life where you get to say, &lsquoI want this and I want this and I want this.&rsquo&rdquo

6 . Do consider your guests. Though traditionally expected, no one is obligated to buy you a gift. Be mindful of the thoughts and feelings of your friends and families. While guests might find it charming to help fund the honeymoon for a couple who is just starting out, they might be offended if you&rsquore hosting a wedding with a six-figure price tag. If your in-laws are vegetarians, don&rsquot register for the deluxe chicken rotisserie. What is a high-priced item on one registry may not break the bank on another. Even though your registry is a wish list, you want to consider how much you are asking guests to spend. For instance, if you&rsquore having a destination wedding, factor in the cost of getting to the location. Says Bailey, &ldquoWe all know what our families can and cannot afford.&rdquo


6 Things to Know When Setting up a Wedding Registry

Y ou&rsquore full of hopes and dreams of building your lives together, but before you and your fiancé grab the scanner and head down the aisles to create a wish list for a wedding registry, here are a few do&rsquos and don&rsquots to consider.

1 . Don&rsquot forget to register. There&rsquos a lot going on in the wedding process, but Jo Anne Hewlett of Make a Memory Event Planning in Newark says registering for gifts is something that shouldn&rsquot slip through the cracks. If the couple doesn&rsquot live together or is just setting up a household, it&rsquos even more important. &ldquoPlus the guys really like it,&rdquo Hewlett says with a laugh, referring to the scan gun they get to use. But don&rsquot get too scan-happy your first time through the store. A 20-page registry can be daunting. Keep in mind that registries are not a once-and-done thing. Check your registry regularly and update it as needed. If you notice everything under $100 is gone and nothing over $100 has been purchased, replenish the lower-price items only.

2 . Don&rsquot forget to research your registry. According to wedding planner Nicole Bailey of Elevee Events in Rehoboth Beach, most brides know where they want to register because it&rsquos where they shop. Even if you&rsquore familiar with the store, you&rsquoll still want to verify what its policies are. Suzanne Edgar of Everything But the Kitchen Sink in Hockessin suggests you find out if the store delivers, charges extra for shipping or provides gift-wrapping services. Ask questions. The people in the store are professionals and want to help you. &ldquoRegistries are so easy,&rdquo Bailey says.

3 . Don&rsquot register for items you don&rsquot want. It seems obvious, but wedding traditions can be hard to break. Just because your fiancé&rsquos great aunt says fine china is a must-have, you aren&rsquot required to pick out a set. Every couple is different. Many brides today are older and moreestablished.Some have been marriedbefore, and others are just starting out. Hewlett also recommends thinking long term. You&rsquoll keep a lot of these gifts forever. You should consider a set of sterling-silver flatware or solid wood salad bowls. Register for what is right for you todayand down the road as well.

4 . Do look for alternatives. If fine china isn&rsquot right for you, Bailey suggests you pick out something of equal value, such as a set of crystal bourbon snifters. If you already have bath towels, consider replacing bed sheets or your second-hand frying pan. There are websites that allow wedding guests to donate to a charity of your choice. Hewlett advises you also think outside the box. While you should never ask outright for cash, there are websites where guests can help fund your honeymoon or contribute to a down payment on a house. Let your guests give you experiences on your honeymoon like a photographer for the day or a parasailing excursion.

5 . Do register for multiple-price points. Your guests are likely to be a diverse group of people with a range of incomes, and you&rsquoll want to give them options. Some guests like to buy several smaller gifts to give together, and sometimes people will join in to buy a higher ticket item. Edgarrecommends you register for items from$1 to a few that are several hundred dollars. &ldquoIt&rsquos a big wish list,&rdquo she says. &ldquoIt&rsquos one of the few times in your life where you get to say, &lsquoI want this and I want this and I want this.&rsquo&rdquo

6 . Do consider your guests. Though traditionally expected, no one is obligated to buy you a gift. Be mindful of the thoughts and feelings of your friends and families. While guests might find it charming to help fund the honeymoon for a couple who is just starting out, they might be offended if you&rsquore hosting a wedding with a six-figure price tag. If your in-laws are vegetarians, don&rsquot register for the deluxe chicken rotisserie. What is a high-priced item on one registry may not break the bank on another. Even though your registry is a wish list, you want to consider how much you are asking guests to spend. For instance, if you&rsquore having a destination wedding, factor in the cost of getting to the location. Says Bailey, &ldquoWe all know what our families can and cannot afford.&rdquo


6 Things to Know When Setting up a Wedding Registry

Y ou&rsquore full of hopes and dreams of building your lives together, but before you and your fiancé grab the scanner and head down the aisles to create a wish list for a wedding registry, here are a few do&rsquos and don&rsquots to consider.

1 . Don&rsquot forget to register. There&rsquos a lot going on in the wedding process, but Jo Anne Hewlett of Make a Memory Event Planning in Newark says registering for gifts is something that shouldn&rsquot slip through the cracks. If the couple doesn&rsquot live together or is just setting up a household, it&rsquos even more important. &ldquoPlus the guys really like it,&rdquo Hewlett says with a laugh, referring to the scan gun they get to use. But don&rsquot get too scan-happy your first time through the store. A 20-page registry can be daunting. Keep in mind that registries are not a once-and-done thing. Check your registry regularly and update it as needed. If you notice everything under $100 is gone and nothing over $100 has been purchased, replenish the lower-price items only.

2 . Don&rsquot forget to research your registry. According to wedding planner Nicole Bailey of Elevee Events in Rehoboth Beach, most brides know where they want to register because it&rsquos where they shop. Even if you&rsquore familiar with the store, you&rsquoll still want to verify what its policies are. Suzanne Edgar of Everything But the Kitchen Sink in Hockessin suggests you find out if the store delivers, charges extra for shipping or provides gift-wrapping services. Ask questions. The people in the store are professionals and want to help you. &ldquoRegistries are so easy,&rdquo Bailey says.

3 . Don&rsquot register for items you don&rsquot want. It seems obvious, but wedding traditions can be hard to break. Just because your fiancé&rsquos great aunt says fine china is a must-have, you aren&rsquot required to pick out a set. Every couple is different. Many brides today are older and moreestablished.Some have been marriedbefore, and others are just starting out. Hewlett also recommends thinking long term. You&rsquoll keep a lot of these gifts forever. You should consider a set of sterling-silver flatware or solid wood salad bowls. Register for what is right for you todayand down the road as well.

4 . Do look for alternatives. If fine china isn&rsquot right for you, Bailey suggests you pick out something of equal value, such as a set of crystal bourbon snifters. If you already have bath towels, consider replacing bed sheets or your second-hand frying pan. There are websites that allow wedding guests to donate to a charity of your choice. Hewlett advises you also think outside the box. While you should never ask outright for cash, there are websites where guests can help fund your honeymoon or contribute to a down payment on a house. Let your guests give you experiences on your honeymoon like a photographer for the day or a parasailing excursion.

5 . Do register for multiple-price points. Your guests are likely to be a diverse group of people with a range of incomes, and you&rsquoll want to give them options. Some guests like to buy several smaller gifts to give together, and sometimes people will join in to buy a higher ticket item. Edgarrecommends you register for items from$1 to a few that are several hundred dollars. &ldquoIt&rsquos a big wish list,&rdquo she says. &ldquoIt&rsquos one of the few times in your life where you get to say, &lsquoI want this and I want this and I want this.&rsquo&rdquo

6 . Do consider your guests. Though traditionally expected, no one is obligated to buy you a gift. Be mindful of the thoughts and feelings of your friends and families. While guests might find it charming to help fund the honeymoon for a couple who is just starting out, they might be offended if you&rsquore hosting a wedding with a six-figure price tag. If your in-laws are vegetarians, don&rsquot register for the deluxe chicken rotisserie. What is a high-priced item on one registry may not break the bank on another. Even though your registry is a wish list, you want to consider how much you are asking guests to spend. For instance, if you&rsquore having a destination wedding, factor in the cost of getting to the location. Says Bailey, &ldquoWe all know what our families can and cannot afford.&rdquo


6 Things to Know When Setting up a Wedding Registry

Y ou&rsquore full of hopes and dreams of building your lives together, but before you and your fiancé grab the scanner and head down the aisles to create a wish list for a wedding registry, here are a few do&rsquos and don&rsquots to consider.

1 . Don&rsquot forget to register. There&rsquos a lot going on in the wedding process, but Jo Anne Hewlett of Make a Memory Event Planning in Newark says registering for gifts is something that shouldn&rsquot slip through the cracks. If the couple doesn&rsquot live together or is just setting up a household, it&rsquos even more important. &ldquoPlus the guys really like it,&rdquo Hewlett says with a laugh, referring to the scan gun they get to use. But don&rsquot get too scan-happy your first time through the store. A 20-page registry can be daunting. Keep in mind that registries are not a once-and-done thing. Check your registry regularly and update it as needed. If you notice everything under $100 is gone and nothing over $100 has been purchased, replenish the lower-price items only.

2 . Don&rsquot forget to research your registry. According to wedding planner Nicole Bailey of Elevee Events in Rehoboth Beach, most brides know where they want to register because it&rsquos where they shop. Even if you&rsquore familiar with the store, you&rsquoll still want to verify what its policies are. Suzanne Edgar of Everything But the Kitchen Sink in Hockessin suggests you find out if the store delivers, charges extra for shipping or provides gift-wrapping services. Ask questions. The people in the store are professionals and want to help you. &ldquoRegistries are so easy,&rdquo Bailey says.

3 . Don&rsquot register for items you don&rsquot want. It seems obvious, but wedding traditions can be hard to break. Just because your fiancé&rsquos great aunt says fine china is a must-have, you aren&rsquot required to pick out a set. Every couple is different. Many brides today are older and moreestablished.Some have been marriedbefore, and others are just starting out. Hewlett also recommends thinking long term. You&rsquoll keep a lot of these gifts forever. You should consider a set of sterling-silver flatware or solid wood salad bowls. Register for what is right for you todayand down the road as well.

4 . Do look for alternatives. If fine china isn&rsquot right for you, Bailey suggests you pick out something of equal value, such as a set of crystal bourbon snifters. If you already have bath towels, consider replacing bed sheets or your second-hand frying pan. There are websites that allow wedding guests to donate to a charity of your choice. Hewlett advises you also think outside the box. While you should never ask outright for cash, there are websites where guests can help fund your honeymoon or contribute to a down payment on a house. Let your guests give you experiences on your honeymoon like a photographer for the day or a parasailing excursion.

5 . Do register for multiple-price points. Your guests are likely to be a diverse group of people with a range of incomes, and you&rsquoll want to give them options. Some guests like to buy several smaller gifts to give together, and sometimes people will join in to buy a higher ticket item. Edgarrecommends you register for items from$1 to a few that are several hundred dollars. &ldquoIt&rsquos a big wish list,&rdquo she says. &ldquoIt&rsquos one of the few times in your life where you get to say, &lsquoI want this and I want this and I want this.&rsquo&rdquo

6 . Do consider your guests. Though traditionally expected, no one is obligated to buy you a gift. Be mindful of the thoughts and feelings of your friends and families. While guests might find it charming to help fund the honeymoon for a couple who is just starting out, they might be offended if you&rsquore hosting a wedding with a six-figure price tag. If your in-laws are vegetarians, don&rsquot register for the deluxe chicken rotisserie. What is a high-priced item on one registry may not break the bank on another. Even though your registry is a wish list, you want to consider how much you are asking guests to spend. For instance, if you&rsquore having a destination wedding, factor in the cost of getting to the location. Says Bailey, &ldquoWe all know what our families can and cannot afford.&rdquo


6 Things to Know When Setting up a Wedding Registry

Y ou&rsquore full of hopes and dreams of building your lives together, but before you and your fiancé grab the scanner and head down the aisles to create a wish list for a wedding registry, here are a few do&rsquos and don&rsquots to consider.

1 . Don&rsquot forget to register. There&rsquos a lot going on in the wedding process, but Jo Anne Hewlett of Make a Memory Event Planning in Newark says registering for gifts is something that shouldn&rsquot slip through the cracks. If the couple doesn&rsquot live together or is just setting up a household, it&rsquos even more important. &ldquoPlus the guys really like it,&rdquo Hewlett says with a laugh, referring to the scan gun they get to use. But don&rsquot get too scan-happy your first time through the store. A 20-page registry can be daunting. Keep in mind that registries are not a once-and-done thing. Check your registry regularly and update it as needed. If you notice everything under $100 is gone and nothing over $100 has been purchased, replenish the lower-price items only.

2 . Don&rsquot forget to research your registry. According to wedding planner Nicole Bailey of Elevee Events in Rehoboth Beach, most brides know where they want to register because it&rsquos where they shop. Even if you&rsquore familiar with the store, you&rsquoll still want to verify what its policies are. Suzanne Edgar of Everything But the Kitchen Sink in Hockessin suggests you find out if the store delivers, charges extra for shipping or provides gift-wrapping services. Ask questions. The people in the store are professionals and want to help you. &ldquoRegistries are so easy,&rdquo Bailey says.

3 . Don&rsquot register for items you don&rsquot want. It seems obvious, but wedding traditions can be hard to break. Just because your fiancé&rsquos great aunt says fine china is a must-have, you aren&rsquot required to pick out a set. Every couple is different. Many brides today are older and moreestablished.Some have been marriedbefore, and others are just starting out. Hewlett also recommends thinking long term. You&rsquoll keep a lot of these gifts forever. You should consider a set of sterling-silver flatware or solid wood salad bowls. Register for what is right for you todayand down the road as well.

4 . Do look for alternatives. If fine china isn&rsquot right for you, Bailey suggests you pick out something of equal value, such as a set of crystal bourbon snifters. If you already have bath towels, consider replacing bed sheets or your second-hand frying pan. There are websites that allow wedding guests to donate to a charity of your choice. Hewlett advises you also think outside the box. While you should never ask outright for cash, there are websites where guests can help fund your honeymoon or contribute to a down payment on a house. Let your guests give you experiences on your honeymoon like a photographer for the day or a parasailing excursion.

5 . Do register for multiple-price points. Your guests are likely to be a diverse group of people with a range of incomes, and you&rsquoll want to give them options. Some guests like to buy several smaller gifts to give together, and sometimes people will join in to buy a higher ticket item. Edgarrecommends you register for items from$1 to a few that are several hundred dollars. &ldquoIt&rsquos a big wish list,&rdquo she says. &ldquoIt&rsquos one of the few times in your life where you get to say, &lsquoI want this and I want this and I want this.&rsquo&rdquo

6 . Do consider your guests. Though traditionally expected, no one is obligated to buy you a gift. Be mindful of the thoughts and feelings of your friends and families. While guests might find it charming to help fund the honeymoon for a couple who is just starting out, they might be offended if you&rsquore hosting a wedding with a six-figure price tag. If your in-laws are vegetarians, don&rsquot register for the deluxe chicken rotisserie. What is a high-priced item on one registry may not break the bank on another. Even though your registry is a wish list, you want to consider how much you are asking guests to spend. For instance, if you&rsquore having a destination wedding, factor in the cost of getting to the location. Says Bailey, &ldquoWe all know what our families can and cannot afford.&rdquo


6 Things to Know When Setting up a Wedding Registry

Y ou&rsquore full of hopes and dreams of building your lives together, but before you and your fiancé grab the scanner and head down the aisles to create a wish list for a wedding registry, here are a few do&rsquos and don&rsquots to consider.

1 . Don&rsquot forget to register. There&rsquos a lot going on in the wedding process, but Jo Anne Hewlett of Make a Memory Event Planning in Newark says registering for gifts is something that shouldn&rsquot slip through the cracks. If the couple doesn&rsquot live together or is just setting up a household, it&rsquos even more important. &ldquoPlus the guys really like it,&rdquo Hewlett says with a laugh, referring to the scan gun they get to use. But don&rsquot get too scan-happy your first time through the store. A 20-page registry can be daunting. Keep in mind that registries are not a once-and-done thing. Check your registry regularly and update it as needed. If you notice everything under $100 is gone and nothing over $100 has been purchased, replenish the lower-price items only.

2 . Don&rsquot forget to research your registry. According to wedding planner Nicole Bailey of Elevee Events in Rehoboth Beach, most brides know where they want to register because it&rsquos where they shop. Even if you&rsquore familiar with the store, you&rsquoll still want to verify what its policies are. Suzanne Edgar of Everything But the Kitchen Sink in Hockessin suggests you find out if the store delivers, charges extra for shipping or provides gift-wrapping services. Ask questions. The people in the store are professionals and want to help you. &ldquoRegistries are so easy,&rdquo Bailey says.

3 . Don&rsquot register for items you don&rsquot want. It seems obvious, but wedding traditions can be hard to break. Just because your fiancé&rsquos great aunt says fine china is a must-have, you aren&rsquot required to pick out a set. Every couple is different. Many brides today are older and moreestablished.Some have been marriedbefore, and others are just starting out. Hewlett also recommends thinking long term. You&rsquoll keep a lot of these gifts forever. You should consider a set of sterling-silver flatware or solid wood salad bowls. Register for what is right for you todayand down the road as well.

4 . Do look for alternatives. If fine china isn&rsquot right for you, Bailey suggests you pick out something of equal value, such as a set of crystal bourbon snifters. If you already have bath towels, consider replacing bed sheets or your second-hand frying pan. There are websites that allow wedding guests to donate to a charity of your choice. Hewlett advises you also think outside the box. While you should never ask outright for cash, there are websites where guests can help fund your honeymoon or contribute to a down payment on a house. Let your guests give you experiences on your honeymoon like a photographer for the day or a parasailing excursion.

5 . Do register for multiple-price points. Your guests are likely to be a diverse group of people with a range of incomes, and you&rsquoll want to give them options. Some guests like to buy several smaller gifts to give together, and sometimes people will join in to buy a higher ticket item. Edgarrecommends you register for items from$1 to a few that are several hundred dollars. &ldquoIt&rsquos a big wish list,&rdquo she says. &ldquoIt&rsquos one of the few times in your life where you get to say, &lsquoI want this and I want this and I want this.&rsquo&rdquo

6 . Do consider your guests. Though traditionally expected, no one is obligated to buy you a gift. Be mindful of the thoughts and feelings of your friends and families. While guests might find it charming to help fund the honeymoon for a couple who is just starting out, they might be offended if you&rsquore hosting a wedding with a six-figure price tag. If your in-laws are vegetarians, don&rsquot register for the deluxe chicken rotisserie. What is a high-priced item on one registry may not break the bank on another. Even though your registry is a wish list, you want to consider how much you are asking guests to spend. For instance, if you&rsquore having a destination wedding, factor in the cost of getting to the location. Says Bailey, &ldquoWe all know what our families can and cannot afford.&rdquo


6 Things to Know When Setting up a Wedding Registry

Y ou&rsquore full of hopes and dreams of building your lives together, but before you and your fiancé grab the scanner and head down the aisles to create a wish list for a wedding registry, here are a few do&rsquos and don&rsquots to consider.

1 . Don&rsquot forget to register. There&rsquos a lot going on in the wedding process, but Jo Anne Hewlett of Make a Memory Event Planning in Newark says registering for gifts is something that shouldn&rsquot slip through the cracks. If the couple doesn&rsquot live together or is just setting up a household, it&rsquos even more important. &ldquoPlus the guys really like it,&rdquo Hewlett says with a laugh, referring to the scan gun they get to use. But don&rsquot get too scan-happy your first time through the store. A 20-page registry can be daunting. Keep in mind that registries are not a once-and-done thing. Check your registry regularly and update it as needed. If you notice everything under $100 is gone and nothing over $100 has been purchased, replenish the lower-price items only.

2 . Don&rsquot forget to research your registry. According to wedding planner Nicole Bailey of Elevee Events in Rehoboth Beach, most brides know where they want to register because it&rsquos where they shop. Even if you&rsquore familiar with the store, you&rsquoll still want to verify what its policies are. Suzanne Edgar of Everything But the Kitchen Sink in Hockessin suggests you find out if the store delivers, charges extra for shipping or provides gift-wrapping services. Ask questions. The people in the store are professionals and want to help you. &ldquoRegistries are so easy,&rdquo Bailey says.

3 . Don&rsquot register for items you don&rsquot want. It seems obvious, but wedding traditions can be hard to break. Just because your fiancé&rsquos great aunt says fine china is a must-have, you aren&rsquot required to pick out a set. Every couple is different. Many brides today are older and moreestablished.Some have been marriedbefore, and others are just starting out. Hewlett also recommends thinking long term. You&rsquoll keep a lot of these gifts forever. You should consider a set of sterling-silver flatware or solid wood salad bowls. Register for what is right for you todayand down the road as well.

4 . Do look for alternatives. If fine china isn&rsquot right for you, Bailey suggests you pick out something of equal value, such as a set of crystal bourbon snifters. If you already have bath towels, consider replacing bed sheets or your second-hand frying pan. There are websites that allow wedding guests to donate to a charity of your choice. Hewlett advises you also think outside the box. While you should never ask outright for cash, there are websites where guests can help fund your honeymoon or contribute to a down payment on a house. Let your guests give you experiences on your honeymoon like a photographer for the day or a parasailing excursion.

5 . Do register for multiple-price points. Your guests are likely to be a diverse group of people with a range of incomes, and you&rsquoll want to give them options. Some guests like to buy several smaller gifts to give together, and sometimes people will join in to buy a higher ticket item. Edgarrecommends you register for items from$1 to a few that are several hundred dollars. &ldquoIt&rsquos a big wish list,&rdquo she says. &ldquoIt&rsquos one of the few times in your life where you get to say, &lsquoI want this and I want this and I want this.&rsquo&rdquo

6 . Do consider your guests. Though traditionally expected, no one is obligated to buy you a gift. Be mindful of the thoughts and feelings of your friends and families. While guests might find it charming to help fund the honeymoon for a couple who is just starting out, they might be offended if you&rsquore hosting a wedding with a six-figure price tag. If your in-laws are vegetarians, don&rsquot register for the deluxe chicken rotisserie. What is a high-priced item on one registry may not break the bank on another. Even though your registry is a wish list, you want to consider how much you are asking guests to spend. For instance, if you&rsquore having a destination wedding, factor in the cost of getting to the location. Says Bailey, &ldquoWe all know what our families can and cannot afford.&rdquo



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