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Creole Seafood Gumbo

Creole Seafood Gumbo


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Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 to 2 Pound large hard-shell crabs
  • 3/4 Cups canola oil
  • 3/4 Cups all-purpose flour, sifted
  • 3 medium yellow onions, diced medium
  • 1 bunch celery, diced medium
  • 4 medium green bell peppers, diced medium
  • 2 Tablespoons minced garlic
  • 1 Teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 Pinch of each dried oregano, basil and thyme
  • 4 large bay leaves
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 Pound okra, sliced 1/4 inch thick
  • 1 14.5 oz can diced tomatoes
  • 3 quarts stock (fish, shrimp, or crab) or water
  • 1 Pound medium shrimp, shelled and deveined
  • 1 quart shucked oysters, in their liquid
  • 1 Pound jumbo lump crab meat
  • 8 Cups cooked white rice, for serving
  • Louisiana hot sauce amd Worcestershire, to taste
  • 1 bunch green onions, thinly sliced
  • File powder

Directions

Remove the top shells of the crabs along with the deadmen (gills) and discard them. Crack the crabs in half, reserve.

Heat the oil in a large 8 quarts Dutch oven until smoking, about 5 minutes. Gradually add the flour and cook over high heat, stirring constantly until the roux is the color of milk chocolate, 3 to 5 minutes; Being careful not to burn.

Add the garlic, onions, bell pepper and celery and cook for 5 minutes until wilted. Add in tomatoes, cayenne pepper, herbs, and bay leaves. Cook for about 3 minutes.

Gradually add 3 quarts of stock to the pot, stirring constantly. Add the crabs and okra. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 1 hour; skimming often. Add the shrimp and cook for 5 minutes.

Add the crabmeat, oysters and their liquor and bring just to a boil over moderate heat. Add Worcestershire, hot sauce and salt and pepper to taste. Serve immediately over the rice and garnish with green onions and dusting of file.


Get your gumbo on for Mardi Gras with these 5 recipes for South Louisiana's signature stew

It’s a fact: If you’re from South Louisiana, you’ve got gumbo in your blood. Not from bayou country? Just because you don’t have gumbo running through your veins doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy it — or make it. All you need is the right ingredients and a yen for a steaming bowl of spicy, smoky stew that will warm you down to your very bones.

So go ahead, make gumbo. Make it for Mardi Gras, or make it because you’re buried up to your elbows in snow. Or make it just because you wanna, as you surely will after looking at these five tempting recipes.

Seafood and okra gumbo: Some will argue that gumbo just isn’t gumbo without okra — or seafood. If you’re that kind of purist, this gumbo’s for you. Even if you’re not, you’ll still love a heaping bowl of this gumbo chock full of a Gulf’s bounty of shrimp, oysters and crabs.

Louisiana Cajun gumbo: There’s Creole-style gumbo (usually lighter), and there’s Cajun-style gumbo (thicker and darker). This recipe is an example of the latter, brought to you in the form of a "Gumbo 101." You’ll learn all you need to know about making roux and get a taste for the different kinds of meat or seafood you might want to include, from duck to andouille sausage.

Mr. B’s Gumbo Ya-Ya: Spicy as sin and dark as the bayou at night, this chicken and andouille gumbo is another example of a Cajun-style gumbo. You can buy a bowl at Mr. B’s Bistro in New Orleans’ French Quarter, but trust us, you’ll want to make it again and again at home.

Gumbo Z’herbes: This greens-based gumbo is a rare animal indeed, typically found only on Holy Thursday at New Orleans’ Dooky Chase's Restaurant and in homes across Southern Louisiana. Though the recipe includes nine types of greens, from turnip to beet tops, it doesn’t forego the meat, calling for pickled pork or hot sausage to lend it a deeply smoky flavor.

Gumbo-laya: Admittedly, this is not your typical gumbo recipe. But, purists, relax: This gumbo/jambalaya hybrid — loaded with sausage, chicken, shrimp and veggies — hits all the right notes for lovers of the smoky stew and the spicy rice dish. And what better way to celebrate Fat Tuesday — a holiday that's all about feasting before fasting — than with an over-the-top mash-up of two Louisiana classics?


Get your gumbo on for Mardi Gras with these 5 recipes for South Louisiana's signature stew

It’s a fact: If you’re from South Louisiana, you’ve got gumbo in your blood. Not from bayou country? Just because you don’t have gumbo running through your veins doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy it — or make it. All you need is the right ingredients and a yen for a steaming bowl of spicy, smoky stew that will warm you down to your very bones.

So go ahead, make gumbo. Make it for Mardi Gras, or make it because you’re buried up to your elbows in snow. Or make it just because you wanna, as you surely will after looking at these five tempting recipes.

Seafood and okra gumbo: Some will argue that gumbo just isn’t gumbo without okra — or seafood. If you’re that kind of purist, this gumbo’s for you. Even if you’re not, you’ll still love a heaping bowl of this gumbo chock full of a Gulf’s bounty of shrimp, oysters and crabs.

Louisiana Cajun gumbo: There’s Creole-style gumbo (usually lighter), and there’s Cajun-style gumbo (thicker and darker). This recipe is an example of the latter, brought to you in the form of a "Gumbo 101." You’ll learn all you need to know about making roux and get a taste for the different kinds of meat or seafood you might want to include, from duck to andouille sausage.

Mr. B’s Gumbo Ya-Ya: Spicy as sin and dark as the bayou at night, this chicken and andouille gumbo is another example of a Cajun-style gumbo. You can buy a bowl at Mr. B’s Bistro in New Orleans’ French Quarter, but trust us, you’ll want to make it again and again at home.

Gumbo Z’herbes: This greens-based gumbo is a rare animal indeed, typically found only on Holy Thursday at New Orleans’ Dooky Chase's Restaurant and in homes across Southern Louisiana. Though the recipe includes nine types of greens, from turnip to beet tops, it doesn’t forego the meat, calling for pickled pork or hot sausage to lend it a deeply smoky flavor.

Gumbo-laya: Admittedly, this is not your typical gumbo recipe. But, purists, relax: This gumbo/jambalaya hybrid — loaded with sausage, chicken, shrimp and veggies — hits all the right notes for lovers of the smoky stew and the spicy rice dish. And what better way to celebrate Fat Tuesday — a holiday that's all about feasting before fasting — than with an over-the-top mash-up of two Louisiana classics?


Get your gumbo on for Mardi Gras with these 5 recipes for South Louisiana's signature stew

It’s a fact: If you’re from South Louisiana, you’ve got gumbo in your blood. Not from bayou country? Just because you don’t have gumbo running through your veins doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy it — or make it. All you need is the right ingredients and a yen for a steaming bowl of spicy, smoky stew that will warm you down to your very bones.

So go ahead, make gumbo. Make it for Mardi Gras, or make it because you’re buried up to your elbows in snow. Or make it just because you wanna, as you surely will after looking at these five tempting recipes.

Seafood and okra gumbo: Some will argue that gumbo just isn’t gumbo without okra — or seafood. If you’re that kind of purist, this gumbo’s for you. Even if you’re not, you’ll still love a heaping bowl of this gumbo chock full of a Gulf’s bounty of shrimp, oysters and crabs.

Louisiana Cajun gumbo: There’s Creole-style gumbo (usually lighter), and there’s Cajun-style gumbo (thicker and darker). This recipe is an example of the latter, brought to you in the form of a "Gumbo 101." You’ll learn all you need to know about making roux and get a taste for the different kinds of meat or seafood you might want to include, from duck to andouille sausage.

Mr. B’s Gumbo Ya-Ya: Spicy as sin and dark as the bayou at night, this chicken and andouille gumbo is another example of a Cajun-style gumbo. You can buy a bowl at Mr. B’s Bistro in New Orleans’ French Quarter, but trust us, you’ll want to make it again and again at home.

Gumbo Z’herbes: This greens-based gumbo is a rare animal indeed, typically found only on Holy Thursday at New Orleans’ Dooky Chase's Restaurant and in homes across Southern Louisiana. Though the recipe includes nine types of greens, from turnip to beet tops, it doesn’t forego the meat, calling for pickled pork or hot sausage to lend it a deeply smoky flavor.

Gumbo-laya: Admittedly, this is not your typical gumbo recipe. But, purists, relax: This gumbo/jambalaya hybrid — loaded with sausage, chicken, shrimp and veggies — hits all the right notes for lovers of the smoky stew and the spicy rice dish. And what better way to celebrate Fat Tuesday — a holiday that's all about feasting before fasting — than with an over-the-top mash-up of two Louisiana classics?


Get your gumbo on for Mardi Gras with these 5 recipes for South Louisiana's signature stew

It’s a fact: If you’re from South Louisiana, you’ve got gumbo in your blood. Not from bayou country? Just because you don’t have gumbo running through your veins doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy it — or make it. All you need is the right ingredients and a yen for a steaming bowl of spicy, smoky stew that will warm you down to your very bones.

So go ahead, make gumbo. Make it for Mardi Gras, or make it because you’re buried up to your elbows in snow. Or make it just because you wanna, as you surely will after looking at these five tempting recipes.

Seafood and okra gumbo: Some will argue that gumbo just isn’t gumbo without okra — or seafood. If you’re that kind of purist, this gumbo’s for you. Even if you’re not, you’ll still love a heaping bowl of this gumbo chock full of a Gulf’s bounty of shrimp, oysters and crabs.

Louisiana Cajun gumbo: There’s Creole-style gumbo (usually lighter), and there’s Cajun-style gumbo (thicker and darker). This recipe is an example of the latter, brought to you in the form of a "Gumbo 101." You’ll learn all you need to know about making roux and get a taste for the different kinds of meat or seafood you might want to include, from duck to andouille sausage.

Mr. B’s Gumbo Ya-Ya: Spicy as sin and dark as the bayou at night, this chicken and andouille gumbo is another example of a Cajun-style gumbo. You can buy a bowl at Mr. B’s Bistro in New Orleans’ French Quarter, but trust us, you’ll want to make it again and again at home.

Gumbo Z’herbes: This greens-based gumbo is a rare animal indeed, typically found only on Holy Thursday at New Orleans’ Dooky Chase's Restaurant and in homes across Southern Louisiana. Though the recipe includes nine types of greens, from turnip to beet tops, it doesn’t forego the meat, calling for pickled pork or hot sausage to lend it a deeply smoky flavor.

Gumbo-laya: Admittedly, this is not your typical gumbo recipe. But, purists, relax: This gumbo/jambalaya hybrid — loaded with sausage, chicken, shrimp and veggies — hits all the right notes for lovers of the smoky stew and the spicy rice dish. And what better way to celebrate Fat Tuesday — a holiday that's all about feasting before fasting — than with an over-the-top mash-up of two Louisiana classics?


Get your gumbo on for Mardi Gras with these 5 recipes for South Louisiana's signature stew

It’s a fact: If you’re from South Louisiana, you’ve got gumbo in your blood. Not from bayou country? Just because you don’t have gumbo running through your veins doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy it — or make it. All you need is the right ingredients and a yen for a steaming bowl of spicy, smoky stew that will warm you down to your very bones.

So go ahead, make gumbo. Make it for Mardi Gras, or make it because you’re buried up to your elbows in snow. Or make it just because you wanna, as you surely will after looking at these five tempting recipes.

Seafood and okra gumbo: Some will argue that gumbo just isn’t gumbo without okra — or seafood. If you’re that kind of purist, this gumbo’s for you. Even if you’re not, you’ll still love a heaping bowl of this gumbo chock full of a Gulf’s bounty of shrimp, oysters and crabs.

Louisiana Cajun gumbo: There’s Creole-style gumbo (usually lighter), and there’s Cajun-style gumbo (thicker and darker). This recipe is an example of the latter, brought to you in the form of a "Gumbo 101." You’ll learn all you need to know about making roux and get a taste for the different kinds of meat or seafood you might want to include, from duck to andouille sausage.

Mr. B’s Gumbo Ya-Ya: Spicy as sin and dark as the bayou at night, this chicken and andouille gumbo is another example of a Cajun-style gumbo. You can buy a bowl at Mr. B’s Bistro in New Orleans’ French Quarter, but trust us, you’ll want to make it again and again at home.

Gumbo Z’herbes: This greens-based gumbo is a rare animal indeed, typically found only on Holy Thursday at New Orleans’ Dooky Chase's Restaurant and in homes across Southern Louisiana. Though the recipe includes nine types of greens, from turnip to beet tops, it doesn’t forego the meat, calling for pickled pork or hot sausage to lend it a deeply smoky flavor.

Gumbo-laya: Admittedly, this is not your typical gumbo recipe. But, purists, relax: This gumbo/jambalaya hybrid — loaded with sausage, chicken, shrimp and veggies — hits all the right notes for lovers of the smoky stew and the spicy rice dish. And what better way to celebrate Fat Tuesday — a holiday that's all about feasting before fasting — than with an over-the-top mash-up of two Louisiana classics?


Get your gumbo on for Mardi Gras with these 5 recipes for South Louisiana's signature stew

It’s a fact: If you’re from South Louisiana, you’ve got gumbo in your blood. Not from bayou country? Just because you don’t have gumbo running through your veins doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy it — or make it. All you need is the right ingredients and a yen for a steaming bowl of spicy, smoky stew that will warm you down to your very bones.

So go ahead, make gumbo. Make it for Mardi Gras, or make it because you’re buried up to your elbows in snow. Or make it just because you wanna, as you surely will after looking at these five tempting recipes.

Seafood and okra gumbo: Some will argue that gumbo just isn’t gumbo without okra — or seafood. If you’re that kind of purist, this gumbo’s for you. Even if you’re not, you’ll still love a heaping bowl of this gumbo chock full of a Gulf’s bounty of shrimp, oysters and crabs.

Louisiana Cajun gumbo: There’s Creole-style gumbo (usually lighter), and there’s Cajun-style gumbo (thicker and darker). This recipe is an example of the latter, brought to you in the form of a "Gumbo 101." You’ll learn all you need to know about making roux and get a taste for the different kinds of meat or seafood you might want to include, from duck to andouille sausage.

Mr. B’s Gumbo Ya-Ya: Spicy as sin and dark as the bayou at night, this chicken and andouille gumbo is another example of a Cajun-style gumbo. You can buy a bowl at Mr. B’s Bistro in New Orleans’ French Quarter, but trust us, you’ll want to make it again and again at home.

Gumbo Z’herbes: This greens-based gumbo is a rare animal indeed, typically found only on Holy Thursday at New Orleans’ Dooky Chase's Restaurant and in homes across Southern Louisiana. Though the recipe includes nine types of greens, from turnip to beet tops, it doesn’t forego the meat, calling for pickled pork or hot sausage to lend it a deeply smoky flavor.

Gumbo-laya: Admittedly, this is not your typical gumbo recipe. But, purists, relax: This gumbo/jambalaya hybrid — loaded with sausage, chicken, shrimp and veggies — hits all the right notes for lovers of the smoky stew and the spicy rice dish. And what better way to celebrate Fat Tuesday — a holiday that's all about feasting before fasting — than with an over-the-top mash-up of two Louisiana classics?


Get your gumbo on for Mardi Gras with these 5 recipes for South Louisiana's signature stew

It’s a fact: If you’re from South Louisiana, you’ve got gumbo in your blood. Not from bayou country? Just because you don’t have gumbo running through your veins doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy it — or make it. All you need is the right ingredients and a yen for a steaming bowl of spicy, smoky stew that will warm you down to your very bones.

So go ahead, make gumbo. Make it for Mardi Gras, or make it because you’re buried up to your elbows in snow. Or make it just because you wanna, as you surely will after looking at these five tempting recipes.

Seafood and okra gumbo: Some will argue that gumbo just isn’t gumbo without okra — or seafood. If you’re that kind of purist, this gumbo’s for you. Even if you’re not, you’ll still love a heaping bowl of this gumbo chock full of a Gulf’s bounty of shrimp, oysters and crabs.

Louisiana Cajun gumbo: There’s Creole-style gumbo (usually lighter), and there’s Cajun-style gumbo (thicker and darker). This recipe is an example of the latter, brought to you in the form of a "Gumbo 101." You’ll learn all you need to know about making roux and get a taste for the different kinds of meat or seafood you might want to include, from duck to andouille sausage.

Mr. B’s Gumbo Ya-Ya: Spicy as sin and dark as the bayou at night, this chicken and andouille gumbo is another example of a Cajun-style gumbo. You can buy a bowl at Mr. B’s Bistro in New Orleans’ French Quarter, but trust us, you’ll want to make it again and again at home.

Gumbo Z’herbes: This greens-based gumbo is a rare animal indeed, typically found only on Holy Thursday at New Orleans’ Dooky Chase's Restaurant and in homes across Southern Louisiana. Though the recipe includes nine types of greens, from turnip to beet tops, it doesn’t forego the meat, calling for pickled pork or hot sausage to lend it a deeply smoky flavor.

Gumbo-laya: Admittedly, this is not your typical gumbo recipe. But, purists, relax: This gumbo/jambalaya hybrid — loaded with sausage, chicken, shrimp and veggies — hits all the right notes for lovers of the smoky stew and the spicy rice dish. And what better way to celebrate Fat Tuesday — a holiday that's all about feasting before fasting — than with an over-the-top mash-up of two Louisiana classics?


Get your gumbo on for Mardi Gras with these 5 recipes for South Louisiana's signature stew

It’s a fact: If you’re from South Louisiana, you’ve got gumbo in your blood. Not from bayou country? Just because you don’t have gumbo running through your veins doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy it — or make it. All you need is the right ingredients and a yen for a steaming bowl of spicy, smoky stew that will warm you down to your very bones.

So go ahead, make gumbo. Make it for Mardi Gras, or make it because you’re buried up to your elbows in snow. Or make it just because you wanna, as you surely will after looking at these five tempting recipes.

Seafood and okra gumbo: Some will argue that gumbo just isn’t gumbo without okra — or seafood. If you’re that kind of purist, this gumbo’s for you. Even if you’re not, you’ll still love a heaping bowl of this gumbo chock full of a Gulf’s bounty of shrimp, oysters and crabs.

Louisiana Cajun gumbo: There’s Creole-style gumbo (usually lighter), and there’s Cajun-style gumbo (thicker and darker). This recipe is an example of the latter, brought to you in the form of a "Gumbo 101." You’ll learn all you need to know about making roux and get a taste for the different kinds of meat or seafood you might want to include, from duck to andouille sausage.

Mr. B’s Gumbo Ya-Ya: Spicy as sin and dark as the bayou at night, this chicken and andouille gumbo is another example of a Cajun-style gumbo. You can buy a bowl at Mr. B’s Bistro in New Orleans’ French Quarter, but trust us, you’ll want to make it again and again at home.

Gumbo Z’herbes: This greens-based gumbo is a rare animal indeed, typically found only on Holy Thursday at New Orleans’ Dooky Chase's Restaurant and in homes across Southern Louisiana. Though the recipe includes nine types of greens, from turnip to beet tops, it doesn’t forego the meat, calling for pickled pork or hot sausage to lend it a deeply smoky flavor.

Gumbo-laya: Admittedly, this is not your typical gumbo recipe. But, purists, relax: This gumbo/jambalaya hybrid — loaded with sausage, chicken, shrimp and veggies — hits all the right notes for lovers of the smoky stew and the spicy rice dish. And what better way to celebrate Fat Tuesday — a holiday that's all about feasting before fasting — than with an over-the-top mash-up of two Louisiana classics?


Get your gumbo on for Mardi Gras with these 5 recipes for South Louisiana's signature stew

It’s a fact: If you’re from South Louisiana, you’ve got gumbo in your blood. Not from bayou country? Just because you don’t have gumbo running through your veins doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy it — or make it. All you need is the right ingredients and a yen for a steaming bowl of spicy, smoky stew that will warm you down to your very bones.

So go ahead, make gumbo. Make it for Mardi Gras, or make it because you’re buried up to your elbows in snow. Or make it just because you wanna, as you surely will after looking at these five tempting recipes.

Seafood and okra gumbo: Some will argue that gumbo just isn’t gumbo without okra — or seafood. If you’re that kind of purist, this gumbo’s for you. Even if you’re not, you’ll still love a heaping bowl of this gumbo chock full of a Gulf’s bounty of shrimp, oysters and crabs.

Louisiana Cajun gumbo: There’s Creole-style gumbo (usually lighter), and there’s Cajun-style gumbo (thicker and darker). This recipe is an example of the latter, brought to you in the form of a "Gumbo 101." You’ll learn all you need to know about making roux and get a taste for the different kinds of meat or seafood you might want to include, from duck to andouille sausage.

Mr. B’s Gumbo Ya-Ya: Spicy as sin and dark as the bayou at night, this chicken and andouille gumbo is another example of a Cajun-style gumbo. You can buy a bowl at Mr. B’s Bistro in New Orleans’ French Quarter, but trust us, you’ll want to make it again and again at home.

Gumbo Z’herbes: This greens-based gumbo is a rare animal indeed, typically found only on Holy Thursday at New Orleans’ Dooky Chase's Restaurant and in homes across Southern Louisiana. Though the recipe includes nine types of greens, from turnip to beet tops, it doesn’t forego the meat, calling for pickled pork or hot sausage to lend it a deeply smoky flavor.

Gumbo-laya: Admittedly, this is not your typical gumbo recipe. But, purists, relax: This gumbo/jambalaya hybrid — loaded with sausage, chicken, shrimp and veggies — hits all the right notes for lovers of the smoky stew and the spicy rice dish. And what better way to celebrate Fat Tuesday — a holiday that's all about feasting before fasting — than with an over-the-top mash-up of two Louisiana classics?


Get your gumbo on for Mardi Gras with these 5 recipes for South Louisiana's signature stew

It’s a fact: If you’re from South Louisiana, you’ve got gumbo in your blood. Not from bayou country? Just because you don’t have gumbo running through your veins doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy it — or make it. All you need is the right ingredients and a yen for a steaming bowl of spicy, smoky stew that will warm you down to your very bones.

So go ahead, make gumbo. Make it for Mardi Gras, or make it because you’re buried up to your elbows in snow. Or make it just because you wanna, as you surely will after looking at these five tempting recipes.

Seafood and okra gumbo: Some will argue that gumbo just isn’t gumbo without okra — or seafood. If you’re that kind of purist, this gumbo’s for you. Even if you’re not, you’ll still love a heaping bowl of this gumbo chock full of a Gulf’s bounty of shrimp, oysters and crabs.

Louisiana Cajun gumbo: There’s Creole-style gumbo (usually lighter), and there’s Cajun-style gumbo (thicker and darker). This recipe is an example of the latter, brought to you in the form of a "Gumbo 101." You’ll learn all you need to know about making roux and get a taste for the different kinds of meat or seafood you might want to include, from duck to andouille sausage.

Mr. B’s Gumbo Ya-Ya: Spicy as sin and dark as the bayou at night, this chicken and andouille gumbo is another example of a Cajun-style gumbo. You can buy a bowl at Mr. B’s Bistro in New Orleans’ French Quarter, but trust us, you’ll want to make it again and again at home.

Gumbo Z’herbes: This greens-based gumbo is a rare animal indeed, typically found only on Holy Thursday at New Orleans’ Dooky Chase's Restaurant and in homes across Southern Louisiana. Though the recipe includes nine types of greens, from turnip to beet tops, it doesn’t forego the meat, calling for pickled pork or hot sausage to lend it a deeply smoky flavor.

Gumbo-laya: Admittedly, this is not your typical gumbo recipe. But, purists, relax: This gumbo/jambalaya hybrid — loaded with sausage, chicken, shrimp and veggies — hits all the right notes for lovers of the smoky stew and the spicy rice dish. And what better way to celebrate Fat Tuesday — a holiday that's all about feasting before fasting — than with an over-the-top mash-up of two Louisiana classics?



Comments:

  1. Morris

    useless venture

  2. Kazrabar

    Well done, I liked it!

  3. Dhu

    No, I can't tell you.

  4. Key

    Of course. It happens. We can communicate on this theme. Here or at PM.



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