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The 10 Best Restaurants in Paris

The 10 Best Restaurants in Paris


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Victor Hugo once said: “To err is human. The ambiance pairs with the food like steak and red wine.

Being a food critic who has to choose the 10 best restaurants in Paris is not unlike being an admissions officer at a top university. You have to select, based on food and ambiance, the very best out of a very large pool of highly qualified candidates. And like admissions officers, food critics are usually proud of their decisions, for, though it wasn’t easy, it was given a lot of thought. We definitely put in a lot of thought when we made our 25 Best Restaurants in France and Monaco list, and even more thought when we made our 101 Best Restaurants in Europe list. Combine those and you get our extremely well-thought-out list of the best restaurants in Paris.

10. Septime

This modern French bistro from a classically trained chef, at home in the trendy 11th arrondissement, offers a $75 minimalist but satisfying tasting menu. Unusual combinations — milk-fed veal with trout roe, slow-cooked pork with anchovy cream — rise above gimmickry to sheer deliciousness. Wines from small, biodynamic producers populate the wine list, and the beautiful blue façade turns many heads.

9. Senderens

Chef Alain Senderens earned Senderens (then named Lucas-Carton, and first opened as the “Taverne Anglaise” in 1732) three Michelin stars and worked at the establishment for more than 20 years. As democratized versions of the haute cuisine that Senderens cooked during his time as chef, items like foie gras poached in vegetable broth and lobster with petits pois and chorizo please food snobs and reluctant eaters alike. The restaurant is still run by the Senderens family.

8. Restaurant Le Meurice at Le Meurice Hotel

Don’t let the plush curtains and ornate chairs at Le Meurice fool you into thinking the food is only for extremely refined tastes. When Alain Ducasse took over the dining room from Yannick Alléno, he and collaborator chef Christophe Saintagne opted for a more “down-played” concept that includes simple ingredients and more vegetables. Menu descriptions are brief: vegetables and fruits, turbot with olives, spicy lamb with artichokes, lobster. Though that will set you back $520 per person, it is worth it.

7. Alain Ducasse au Plaza Athénée at Plaza Athénée Hotel

Alain Ducasse strikes again. Beneath a chandelier starburst of 10,000 dangling, illuminated crystal pendants is a space that evokes fine dining in opulent Louis XIV style, Alain Ducasse au Plaza Athénée serves the finest seasonal contemporary French cuisine. The produce-centric dishes still include some meat and seafood, but the emphasis is on greens and grains, as well as vegetables grown in the château garden at Versailles. Don’t let this freak you out, but Ducasse strives to create a more "natural" cuisine by cutting back on cream, butter, and sugar. The fact that he can do so and still earn three Michelin stars is amazing.

6. Le Carré des Feuillants

If you’re going to eat frog legs in France, do it here. Chef Alain Dutournier’s spicy frog legs and chanterelle mushrooms with rocket salad, wheat, and watercress juice is legendary, as is his roasted red mullet with sea urchin and botarga, served with cabbage semolina and black olive oil; thick chop of "Noir de Bigorre" pork served with truffle macaroni and white beet; and caramelized ginger and figs topped with walnut crisp and served with a side of walnut ice cream. Though more modern-looking than some of the other restaurants on this list, Le Carré des Feuillants will soon be the stuff of history.

5. Epicure at Le Bristol

Scallops with white truffle gnocchi, watercress juice, and brown butter; foie gras cooked en papillote, served with oysters and Brussels sprouts and a black tea-infused broth; pasta stuffed with black truffle, artichoke, and foie gras and baked with aged Parmigiano-Reggiano; and lychee with rose-scented meringue, pear, and lemon. Need we say more? Yes, we need. Enjoy beautiful views of the French garden while enjoying chef Éric Fréchon’s consistently fantastic meals.

4. L'Atelier Saint-Germain de Joël Robuchon

The illustrious French chef returned from his decade-long retirement with a bang by opening L'Atelier Saint-Germain de Joël Robuchon, which combines his French technique with food inspired by his travels through Japan and Spain. Our favorite dish is Robuchon's renowned Le Burger, composed of two marvelous beef, foie gras, and tomato sliders, accompanied by chips and a tomato, soy, sesame, and Armagnac sauce.

3. Le Cinq at the Four Seasons Hotel George V

With a wine cellar housing 50,000 bottles and two Louis XIV cupboards, golden Louis XVI medallion chairs, sumptuous velvet curtains, and enormous Regency mirrors, Le Cinq is the place where you want to order items like spider crab from Brittany with gold caviar, fennel cream, and lime crab cake; milk-fed veal sweetbread, browned and served with licorice, steamed chanterelles, apricot, and Corsican ham shavings; and a selection of regional cheeses.

2. Guy Savoy

Guy Savoy is a master at imagining combinations that aren't immediately obvious but that make wonderful sense, like artichoke soup with black truffles and brioche spread with truffle-mushroom butter; beets of different hues with crab meat; Bresse chicken breast with lemongrass and chard glazed with chicken stock and bay; and terrine of grapefruit with tea sauce. Don’t let the sensible, subdued décor fool you into thinking the food will not blow your mind.

1. L’Arpège

We voted L’Arpège the No. 1 best restaurant in Europe, and for good reason. Alain Passard, a protégé of Alain Senderens, combines tradition with daring. He uses vegetables sourced from his three biodynamic farms in various parts of France to make haricots verts with fresh almonds and white peaches; vegetable sushi with fig leaves and tomato "petals"; lemon cucumber with hazelnut praline and acidulated cream; and a remarkable take on ratatouille, involving both cooked and raw vegetables — all far more complex and irresistible than they might sound. Though these dishes have no meat, they are clearly prepared with the same careful attention and gusto with which Passard learned to cook rotisserie-roasted duckling, chicken, lamb, and game birds from his late grandmother. There are far more expensive restaurants in Paris, but few of them match the service, food, and comfort of L’Arpège.


11 Best Gourmet Recipes | Popular Gourmet Recipes

Gourmet Recipes- "There is no sincerer love than the love of food", and we couldn't agree more with George Bernard Shaw whose quote is famously used by food lovers across the globe. Food has the power to not only nourish one's soul but also bring people together. If you love to cook then you will know that when you transform seasonal veggies and fresh meat into spectacular dishes to wow your guests' palate, it's an overwhelming feeling. Gourmet recipes that we see in restaurants, which almost always leave us spellbound, of course require great skill and finesse to be perfect. But the truth is, if you are passionate about cooking, you can also create gourmet dishes in your own kitchen.

With some patience and few trial and errors, you can learn to master various culinary tricks in your kitchen. And as you open up to experimenting and discovering new flavours, textures, food combinations and aromas, you will in no time be able to cook up your own repertoire of gourmet recipes.


10 Insanely Good Parisian Cocktails You Can Make at Home Today

Paris is known for its wonderful wines, but its alcoholic offerings by no means end there. Home to some of the best bars in the world, it’s no wonder this city’s cocktails are such a hit among locals and tourists alike.

From timeless classics to modern mixes, here’s a list of 10 Parisian Cocktails to give you a taste of Paris, wherever you are.

1. The Black Rose

Dating back to the Art Deco Era, this pretty little thing is a favourite amongst Parisians, both young and old. While it may look as feminine as a flower, don’t be fooled its heavy dose of Vermouth certainly packs a punch, and one too many of these pink potions and you’ll be drooping over.

Ingredients:

  • 2 oz French Vermouth
  • 1 oz Blackberry Cordial
  • 1 teaspoon Blackberry Syrup
  • Blackberries & Rosemary to garnish

Method:

Strain measured ingredients into a short glass over ice. Garnish with blackberries, a sprig of rosemary et voilà !

2. The Sidecar

The name speaks for itself: you’ll be in no state to get behind the wheel after a few sips of this stuff, that’s for sure! There is some dispute over its creation—with no other than The Ritz Hotel, Paris taking claim for this age-old classic—created way back when sidecars were actually a thing. Wherever it originated from, boy are we glad it came into existence!

Recipe:

  • 1 1/2oz Cognac or Armagnac or Bourbon
  • 1oz Cointreau or Triple Sec Orange Liqueur
  • 1/2oz Lemon Juice
  • Lemon Twist to garnish
  • Sugar for rimming (optional)

Method:

Shake up Cognac, Cointreau and Lemon Juice in a shaker filled with ice. Wet rim of tall glass and dip in sugar to coat. Strain Cocktail into glass, top with lemon twist, et voilà!

3. Le Forum Cocktail

If you’re lucky enough to actually be in Paris, you should hit up Le Forum, one of Paris’ most historic cocktail bars. At 85 years old, it’s as much of a museum as it is bar what better excuse is there to drink than that? Devised in the Roaring Twenties, it’s a Parisian twist on the classic Gin Martini. It was popular then, and remains so, now. It’s featured on their menu, even today.

Ingredients:

Method:

Stir ingredients in a large glass filled with ice and strain over frozen Martini Glass.

4. The French Martini

Paris is scandalously sexy, and a few sips on a French Martini is sure to get you feeling that way, too. A sumptuous purple colour issuing from the famous Chambord, it gives a nod to its heritage—it’s Louis XIV himself who is said to be the first to have sampled the liqueur.
It’s an elegant love potion made in the City of Love itself. And well, if it was good enough for The King, surely it’s great for anyone, don’t you think?

  • 1 1/2 oz Chambord flavoured Vodka
  • 1/2 oz Chambord liqueur
  • 2 oz Pineapple Juice
  • Fresh Raspberries to garnish

Add Ingredients to a mixer filled with ice, shake, then strain over a Martini glass. Garnish with raspberries to serve, et voilà!

5. Serendipiti

A cocktail with its own cheer you’ll shout its name upon tasting! This noisy number hails from one of the most glamorous hotels in the world: The Ritz, Paris. A refreshing, fruity concoction with added bubbles, it’s elegant and sophisticated—just like the place itself. If getting hold of one of the Ritz’ world class cocktail recipes isn’t a reason to shout, I don’t know what is! Serendipiti!

Ingredients:

  • 1 oz Calvados (or Apple Brandy of choice)
  • 1 oz Apple Juice
  • Champagne to fill
  • Spring of Mint

Method :

Add Apple brandy and mint to a tall tumbler, mashing the two to mix and bruise leaves. Fill with ice, then pour over apple juice. Top to brim with Champagne, garnish with mint et voilà!

6. Bobo Parisian

Make way, Hemingway! Here comes the new, hipster, gin-drinking Parisian: a Bobo. The Parisian hipsters already have a drink named after them and you can get your hand on one of these at equally edgy bar, Jefrey’s, in the 2ème arrondissement of Paris.
If the City of Lights doesn’t happen to be right at your doorstep, don’t fret with this bitter beverage, you can recreate a piece of Paris chez toi. No, it’s not the easiest of drinks to make, but becoming Parisian–and a hipster one at that—doesn’t happen overnight!

Ingredients:

  • 1 3/4 oz Gin (Tanqueray preferred)
  • 1/2 oz St. Germain
  • 1/2 oz King L’avion D’or
  • 1 dash Rhubarb Bitters
  • White of 1 Egg
  • Splash of Club Soda
  • Star Anise to garnish

Method:

Shake everything up in an iced cocktail shaker. Pour into an over-sized tea-cup, top with floating star anise to serve et voilà!

7. Libertine

If you’re a free thinker that disregards social norms, this cocktail is for you—or so says it’s creator, Jen Riley of Le Red House in Paris. With a reputation for fun over fancy, the Dive Bar’s eclectic range of inventive and intriguing drinks have made it a favourite among hipsters and bartender professionals alike. Get in on the action:

Ingredients:

  • 1 oz Vodka
  • 2 tsps Campari
  • 2 tsps Simple Syrup
  • 2 tsp Lemon Juice
  • 1 tsp Grapefruit Juice
  • 1/2 oz Egg White
  • 1 bar spoon Rhubarb & Ginger Jam
  • 1/2 oz Ruby Port

Method:

Add ingredients to shaker filled with ice and shake to combine. Double strain, then shake again without ice. Pour into Champagne flute, top with Ruby Port et voilà!

8. Dirty Margarita

While the idea of Caper Juice in a cocktail might put you off, knowing it was thought up by Rob McHardy of the World Famous Parisian NightClub, Silencio, should help reassure you. David Lynch’s Paris Club is known for being one of the most exclusive in the city, and its cocktails are just as divine.
Can’t be bothered to queue ? Turn your pad into a Parisian party and shake up this quirky take on a classic Margarita for extra cool points.

Ingredients:

  • 5cl Ocho Blanco Tequila
  • 2cl freshly squeezed Lime Juice
  • 1cl Cointreau
  • 0.35cl salted Caper Juice
  • 0.4cl Agave Syrup
  • Lime Zest

Method:

Shake vigorously is a mixer, double strain and pour into a chilled Martini Glass. Garnish with Lime Zest to serve et voilà!

9. Le Maudit Français

Pushing Parisian boundaries in both taste and name, this Cocktail comes from one of the most popular bars in Paris, The Experimental Cocktail Club. ‘Le Maudit Français’ translates as ‘Bloody French’, and can be both a compliment or an insult, depending on your mood. So whether you love them or hate them, this cocktail is the one for you!

Ingredients:

  • 3 measures Darroze 8-year Armagnac
  • 1 measure Oloroso Sherry
  • 1 measure freshly squeezed Orange Juice
  • 1 measure Maple Syrup
  • 3 measures Champagne
  • Dash of Bittermans Boston Bitters
  • Orange Zest

Method:

Add all ingredients except Champagne, Bitters & Orange into a shaker filled with ice. Shake vigorously, pour into a Champagne flute and top with Bitters. Top with orange zest to serve et voilà!

10. French 75

Forget the Arc de Triomphe Harry’s New York Bar, Paris, offers just as much culture, dating back to 1911. Also the birthplace of the Bloody Mary, the French 75 is a light, refreshing and sophisticated cocktail that suits its Parisian surroundings perfectly.
Simple to make with added bubbles, sit back with one of these in hand, close your eyes, and think of Paris. Ahh, la vie est belle!

Ingredients:

  • 2 oz Champagne
  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice
  • 1 oz Gin
  • 2 dashes Simple Syrup
  • Lemon Twist

Method:

Add gin, champagne & syrup to a cocktail shaker filled with ice, shaking vigorously, to combine. Strain into an iced champagne flute. Top with champagne, garnish with lemon twist et voilà!

Grab your shaker, grab your friends, and get mixing there’s never a bad time for a famous Parisian Cocktail!

Which one is your favourite? Which one are you planning to enjoy with friends? Leave your comments below!
Enjoy the best restaurants Paris has to offer with your copy of Paris for Foodies. It’s the ULTIMATE guide to eating in Paris!

About the Author Frederic Bibard

Frederic Bibard is the founder of Talk in French, a company that helps french learners to practice and improve their french. Macaron addict. Jacques Audiard fan. You can contact him on Twitter and Google +


The 23 Best Bistros in Paris

Landon Nordeman

I’m a dyed-in-the-wool fan of old-fashioned Paris bistros, most of which are located in the heart of the city. But I also love the new generation of contemporary bistros that have opened within the last ten years or so, many of which can be found in quiet residential arrondissements, like the 11th and 15th, that are quite a hike from the city center—and are well worth the journey for their innovative and typically reasonably priced menus. Below, a guide to my favorite Paris bistros, old and new. Dinner for two with drinks and tip runs about $80 at the inexpensive places $100 to $140 at the moderate ones and as much as $200 at the expensive establishments.

1. Afaria 15 rue Desnouettes, 15th arrondissement (33/1/4856-1536). Inexpensive. This two-year-old bistro is the brainchild of chef Julien Duboue, who trained with such top toques as Paris’s Alain Dutournier and New York’s Daniel Boulud. The menu changes often but runs to delicious Basque-Landais dishes like cold artichoke soup, fried baby squid, and sea bream with a “spaghetti paella.”

2. Allard 41 rue St-Andre des Arts, 6th arrondissement (33/1/4326-4823). Expensive. Established in 1931, this remains one of the city’s most beloved old-guard bistros, and for good reason. Dishes like escargots in parsley butter, house foie gras terrine, and roast duck with olives are top-notch.
Recipe: Escargots a la Bourguignonne (Snails in Garlic-Herb Butter)
Recipe: Canard aux Olives (Roast Duck with Olives)

3. L’Ami Jean27 rue Malar, 7th arrondissement (33/1/4705-8689). Moderate. Chef Stephane Jego, who worked under bistro wizard Yves Camdeborde, founder of La Regalade (see Article: The New Bistro), serves market-driven southwestern French and Basque cooking. Don’t miss the ravioli stuffed with roast pork and mushrooms, and the wild salmon steak with baby squid.

4. L’Ami Louis 32 rue Vertbois, 3rd arrondissement (33/1/4887-7748). Expensive. Come to this temple of classic bistro cuisine for generous portions of garlicky, crunchy potato galette, grilled veal kidneys, whole roast chicken with heaps of frites, and tender milk-fed lamb.
Recipe: Galette de Pomme de Terre (Potato Galette)
Recipe: Poulet Roti (Roast Chicken)
Recipe: Bistro Pommes Frites (Bistro French Fries)

5. Auberge Pyrenees Cevennes 106 rue de la Folie-Mericourt, 11th arrondissement (33/1/4357-3378). Moderate. This is a terrific example of a good old-fashioned neighborhood bistro, with sausages dangling from huge beams overhead and antlers mounted on the walls. Expect friendly service, reasonable prices, hearty dishes like cassoulet and veal sweetbreads in port sauce, and Lyonnais specialties such as quenelles de brochet.

6. Aux Lyonnais 32 rue St-Marc, 2nd arrondissement (33/1/4296-6504). Moderate. Since taking over this famous old bistro in 2002, Alain Ducasse has artfully updated the menu while preserving the soul of the bistro. Lighter dishes like cervelle de Canut—a fresh, soft cheese whipped with herbs and shallots—and poached haddock with lentils in vinaigrette prevail, but there are still plenty of hearty Lyonnais classics.

7. Le Baratin 3 rue Jouye-Rouve, 20th arrondissement (33/1/4349-3970). Inexpensive. This small, crowded bistro in Belleville, one of the last bohemian neighborhoods in Paris, is a major expedition from the city center, but that hasn’t stopped it from becoming the place where chefs like Joel Robuchon and Yves Camdeborde come for a night-off feast of chef Raquel Carena’s fabulous home-style cooking. The daily-changing menu ranges from oxtail braised with citrus fruits to ragout of cod and shrimp with saffron.

8. Le Bistrot Paul Bert 18 rue Paul Bert, 11th arrondissement (33/1/4372-24-01). Moderate. Chef Thierry Laurent serves some of the best terrine de campagne in Paris at this genial new bistro. Also very good: entrecote with bone marrow and french fries, duck with pears, and beef cheeks braised in red wine.
Recipe: Joues de Boeuf Confites (Braised Beef Cheeks)

9. Le Chateaubriand 129 avenue Parmentier, 11th arrondissement (33/1/4357-4595). Moderate. The first time I ate chef Inaki Aizpitarte’s cooking, it knocked me out, and he’s only gotten better since he set up shop at this sepia-toned former grocery store. Aizpitarte’s globally influenced “cuisine de vagabonde” exhibits stunning imagination, as in dishes like sea bass with red chicory and lemon creme fraiche.

10. Chez Denise 5 rue des Prouvaires, 1st arrondissement (33/1/4236-2182). Moderate. This bistro, also known as La Tour de Monthlhery, serves trenchermen’s portions of headcheese, charcuterie, roasted marrowbones, and rib steaks with fabulous frites until 5:00 a.m. Boisterous, friendly, and completely Parisian.

11. Chez Dumonet/Josephine 117 rue du Cherche-Midi, 6th arrondissement (33/1/4548-5240). Moderate. This 112-year-old bistro, located in a stunning 19th-century space, serves dishes like morel mushrooms stuffed with foie gras, truffles, and country ham a sumptuous mille-feuille of boned pigeon and crisp sliced potatoes and one of the best boeuf a la bourguignonnes in Paris. End with the Grand Marnier souffle.

12. Chez Georges 1 rue du Mail, 2nd arrondissement (33/1/4260-0711). Moderate. Time stands still at this century-old bistro in the heart of Paris that serves bistro classics like blanquette de veau (veal breast served with a lemony cream sauce), chicken liver terrine, and wonderful cream puffs with hot chocolate sauce.

13. Chez Michel 10 rue de Belzunce, 10th arrondissement (33/1/4453-0620). Moderate. Since it’s one of her favorite restaurants, yes, that gorgeous blonde in the corner at this vintage bistro near the Gare du Nord just might be Catherine Deneuve. Aptly named chef Thierry Breton’s Breton-inspired cooking is reliably delicious, with dishes like kig ha farz (a stew of pork and veal served with buckwheat stuffing), great game in season, and one of the best Paris-Brest pastries (a ring of choux pastry filled with hazelnut cream) in town.

14. Le Cochon a l’Oreille 15 rue Montmartre, 1st arrondissement (33/1/4236-0756). Moderate. In the old market district of Les Halles, a diverse crowd of happy Parisians packs into this 97-year-old bistro’s compact Belle Époque dining room to tuck into dishes like confit de canard and stuffed pork with lentils.

15. L’Ecailler du Bistrot 22 rue Paul Bert, 11th arrondissement (33/1/4372-7677). Moderate. Sister restaurant to Le Bistrot Paul Bert (see No. 8), this may be the best seafood-oriented bistro in Paris, with impeccable fish at reasonable prices. Try briny Utah Beach oysters from Normandy or a terrific line-caught grilled sole with baby potatoes sauteed in salted butter and fresh tarragon.

16. L’Epigramme 9 rue de l’Eperon, 6th arrondissement (33/1/4441-0009). Moderate. This tiny place has been a hit ever since it opened two years ago. Chef Pierre Neveuserve’s first-rate contemporary French bistro cooking includes dishes like braised veal with roasted artichokes and duck filet in a jus of blackcurrant liqueur with a side of new potatoes.
Recipe: Tendron de Veau avec Artichauts (Braised Veal Breast with Artichokes)

17. La Fontaine de Mars 129 rue St-Dominique, 7th arrondissement (33/1/4705-4644). Moderate. This popular, well-mannered bourgeois bistro with lace curtains, red-checked tablecloths, and wry but polite waiters always gets it just right, with a superb roster of good old-fashioned Gallic food, including marinated leeks, seared foie gras with pears, sole meuniere, and duck breast with olives and eggplant caviar, plus a roster of daily specials like roast chicken and roast lamb.

18. Frenchie 5 rue du Nil, 2nd arrondissement (33/1/4039-9619). Moderate. The brilliant market-menu cooking of chef Gregory Marchand features cosmopolitan dishes like crab-stuffed ravioli with parsley juice and shellfish, roast shoulder of lamb with eggplant, spinach and pickled lemon, and tapioca with coconut shavings, wild strawberries, and coriander.

19. Le Hide Koba’s Bistro 10 rue de General Lanrezac, 17th arrondissement (33/01-4574-1581). Moderate. Near the Arc de Triomphe, chef Hide Kobayashi’s bistro offers an impeccable take on traditional French bistro cooking with letter-perfect versions of such classic dishes as tarte d’escargots, celery root remoulade with marinated salmon, beef entrecote, and creme brulee.
Recipe: Celeri-Rave Remoulade (Celery Root Remoulade)

20. Jadis 208 rue de la Croix-Nivert, 15th arrondissement (33/1/4557-7320). Moderate. In French, the name of this popular two-year-old bistro means “in times gone by,” a nod from talented young chef Guillaume Delage to France’s rich culinary heritage. Delage serves a menu that veers between contemporary French bistro cooking—including dishes like escargots in puff pastry with oyster mushrooms and romaine lettuce, and sea bream in a wasabi cream sauce with sweet potato puree—and stalwarts like roast shoulder of lamb with white beans, tomatoes, and black olives.

21. Le Quincy 28 avenue Ledru-Rollin, 12th arrondissement (33/1/4628-4676). Inexpensive. This funky, old-fashioned space near the Gare de Lyon features pure bistro cooking, including dishes like cold beef-muzzle salad, farmhouse terrine with a garlicky cabbage salad, rich goose cassoulet, and rabbit cooked in white wine and shallots.

22. La Regalade Saint-Honore 123 rue St-Honore, 1st arrondissement (33/1/4221-9240). Moderate. At this new branch of La Regalade (see (see Article: The New Bistro), chef Bruno Doucet’s menu has been a phenomenal hit ever since it opened seven months ago. The fresh tasting and precisely executed cuisine du marche includes dishes like free-range Basque pork belly on a bed of lentils and cod steak with wilted spinach, chopped hard-boiled egg, tomatoes, and tiny croutons in a light vinaigrette. Smaller and with a more modern decor than the original location (at 49 avenue Jean-Moulin, 14th arrondissement), but every bit as good.

23. Restaurant du Marche 59 rue de Dantzig, 15th arrondissement (33/1/4828-3155). Moderate. At the very edge of Paris, chef Francis Leveque has turned this snug dining room with bare wood tables and bric-a-brac decorating the walls into one of the city’s best bistros. The menu changes regularly, but dishes like baked potatoes stuffed with escargots, grilled pork terrine with a perfect mesclun salad, and a sublime hachis Parmentier (a French version of shepherd’s pie) with duck confit are stunningly good.

Hotel Bel-Ami 7-11 rue St-Benoit, 75006 Paris (33/1/4261/5353)
Marriott Renaissance Arc de Triomphe 39 Avenue de Wagram, 75017 Paris (33/1/5537/5537)
Four Seasons Hotel George V Paris 31, avenue George V, 75008 Paris (33/1/4952/70 00)


4) Chez Fernand Christine

8.5/10: France Hotel Guide expert rating

At Chez Fernand Christine, the boeuf bourguignon is as good as their homemade mashed potatoes. The emphasis is put on tradition in this typical Parisian bistro. The rustic decoration and warm welcome make you comfortable right away and the aroma of your table companion’s dishes whets your appetite.
Whether it is for lunch or dinner, by eating at Chez Fernand Christine you’re sure to eat an excellent boeuf bourguignon and have a great time.

Quite well-known by tourists, if there is some waiting, you will be invited to take a drink at the bar, although you can also book a table before coming.

Our advice: if you’ve never had escargots as appetizers, then you MUST try it here! They are both simple and tasty.

Boeuf bourguignon’s price: €24 (with choice of sides and made out of beef cheeks only)

Opening hours :
12pm – 14:30pm then 7pm – 11pm every day.

Where? 9 Rue Christine, 75006 Paris
Access: Metro 10 (Odéon or Mabillon) OR metro 4 (Odéon)
Book a table : 01 43 25 18 55

– TripAdvisor’s rating: 4/5
– Google’s rating: 4.3/5


The Most Famous Food in Paris—And Where to Try It

1. Croissants: Cheap, yet unforgettable

Start your day like a true Parisian and get yourself an all-butter croissant for breakfast!

Croissants may look simple, but these perfectly flaky pastries require time (we’re talking several days!) and a whole set of skills to perfect. Whether you have them with your coffee, orange juice, or on their own, croissants are guaranteed to brighten up your morning!

And no need to worry about missing out on precious sightseeing time to sit down for breakfast. While lunch and dinner are more sacred sit-down affairs, breakfast on the go is completely acceptable here in France, so you can enjoy your croissant wherever.

Where to try them: Stay away from frozen industrial croissants and only order your pastries from true artisan bakeries. A great option is La Maison d’Isabelle ( 47ter Boulevard Saint-Germain ), which recently received an award for Best Croissant in Paris. The boulangerie makes truly unforgettable croissants using organic flour and certified butter from the Charente-Poitou region.

Few pleasures in life rival that of a freshly baked croissant.

2. Escargots: A national symbol

You just can’t leave Paris without trying them!

Though we enjoy snails cooked in a variety of ways in Paris, the Burgundy recipe remains the most popular. The escargots (usually a dozen of them) are presented in their shells and stuffed with a mouthwatering combination of garlic, herbs and butter.

However, escargots are now so popular that countless Paris restaurants have put their own creative spin on the dish. You’ll now find snails served with Roquefort, truffle, and even curry-based sauces, and so much more.

Want to know the best part? Not only are escargots delicious, but they’re also rich in iron and magnesium!

Where to try them: L’Escargot Montorgueil is a true Parisian institution that has been serving snails for nearly 200 years. You can sample the traditional Burgundy variety, or spice things up and try the curry, foie gras, or truffle butter versions!

Escargots are the most delicious way to step out of your culinary comfort zone.

3. Macarons

Not to be confused with macaroons (shredded coconut delicacies), macarons are possibly the best thing that ever happened to French sweets. Their delicate and airy shells are made of almond flour, and filled with a rich, luscious interior.

Nobody is quite sure where, exactly, these iconic treats come from. Some stories credit Catherine de Medici with the idea others, a late 18th-century French Carmelite convent. But no matter which version of the story you believe, macarons might just be the most famous food in Paris today.

Popular flavors include pistachio, chocolate, vanilla or raspberry, but don’t be scared to try some of the more unusual options: salted butter caramel, green tea, or rose petals, just to name a few.

Where to try them: Paris abounds with macaron specialty shops, most of them offering incredible quality. Pierre Hermé remains a clear favorite of ours for his creativity—and his Balinese dark chocolate macaron.

Dessert lovers should also try “Symphonie,” an innovative recipe by Tokyo-born Sadaharu Aoki . His scrumptious violet macaron comes filled with violet and earl grey creams as well as fresh raspberries. Délicieux!

Nothing says “Paris” quite like an assortment of colorful macarons.

4. Jambon-beurre: Paris street food at its best

Who knew sandwiches could taste so good?

Simplicity is key for this beloved lunch snack. A great jambon-beurre is all about the quality of its only three ingredients: Parisian ham, butter and, of course, the deliciously crispy baguette that’s holding the magic together.

But because the ingredient list is so short, it’s worth it to ensure that each one is of the utmost quality. That means a perfectly crusty baguette, excellent French butter, and real Parisian ham. (And yes, there’s a difference between this and your standard ham.)

Where to try it: Made from carefully-selected ingredients, the jambon-beurre sandwich at La Fontaine de Belleville is famous throughout the city. You can opt to have it to go, or sit down at the terrace and enjoy it alongside a green salad.

5. Steak tartare

Eating raw meat may not be for everyone, but for daring foodies, the reward promises to be extremely flavorful!

Steak tartare is a bistro classic that consists of raw ground beef seasoned with capers, onion and black pepper. Traditionally, you’ll find it served with a raw egg yolk on top.

Despite its popularity in France today, steak tartare actually came to the area by way of modern-day Mongolia. In the 17th century, Russian sailors brought it to Europe, and the rest is history.

Where to try it: Le Severo is heaven for carnivores, so you can expect the meat quality to be absolutely top notch. Their amazingly tasty steak tartare comes with french fries or green beans.

Steak tartare is one of the must-try foods in Paris. Photo credit: insatiable munch

6. Cheese

“How can you govern a country which has 246 varieties of cheese?” former French president Charles De Gaulle famously asked. We don’t have the answer, but we do know that visiting such a country is bound to be a treat!

In fact, France offers more than 300 varieties of cheeses, ranging from creamy Brie de Meaux to pungent Munster. That’s over 300 possibilities to fall in love with French fromage !

Cheese is so highly regarded in France today that it’s even earned its place as part of the meal. A cheese course is traditionally served between the main course and dessert (or sometimes in place of the latter).

Where to try it : A La Ville de Rodez (22 Rue Vieille du Temple) has been a cheese lover’s dream come true since 1920.

There’s no such thing as too much French cheese.

7. Onion soup

Another famous food in Paris, onion soup is about as comforting as it gets.

According to legend, the recipe was invented by Louis XV nearly three centuries ago. Nowadays, the caramelized onion and beef broth is served gratinéed with crusty croutons and a slice of Gruyère cheese on top. And, oui bien sûr , it tastes as good as it sounds.

The preparation of traditional French onion soup is as simple as it gets, and a testament to how seriously we take our gastronomy here in France. What other place on earth could take the humble onion and elevate it to such culinary heights?

Where to try it: Order it from the excellent Bistrot des Vosges , where the onion soup is maiso n (homemade), and to die for.

Few things are as comforting as France’s iconic onion soup.

15 years may have passed since Parisian-bred Sophie embarked on new adventures abroad, yet her love for French food has never diminished. Every few months, she returns to the capital for one main reason: vanilla macarons.


Recipes

This Vanilla, Hazelnut, White Chocolate and Maple Entremet recipe is one of the most delicious examples of the Canadian culinary soul, thank you chef Yann Le .

Preparing a home-cooked meal is a great way to show someone you care. You can tell when a dish has been prepared with love, and time and effort has gone into .

Le Cordon Bleu Chefs wish you all a very happy Valentine’s day and for the occasion propose an original entremets recipe. Try it with your lover, between .

Summer has arrived and what could be more fitting than a dessert bursting with lemon cream and red berries, nestled inside of a light choux pastry. The .

When there is an abundance of fresh cherries we know summer is in full swing. Gentle poaching in merlot and arranging the fruit on top of an almond cream base .

With fresh ingredients this seasonal recipe is as simple to make as it is delicious.

If you are a fan of cinnamon but also like a mixture of other spices as well, these cinnamon macarons with chai latte ganache filling are perfect for you!

In 2019, Chef Kerth Gumbs performed a guest demonstration at the Le Cordon Bleu London Summer Festival. Demonstrating some of the incredible dishes that Ormer .

Florence Lesage, women pastry Chef at The Westin Paris Vendôme hotel shares her recipe of Mini Tropezians Vanilla.


Meringues

Who would’ve thought beating and whisking the egg whites can give the world a tasty treat. A Meringue a day keeps the blues away.

Mille-Feuille

This classic french pastry, also called ‘Napoleon’, is light, flaky and airy, but also heavy with cream and jam between the layers. Literally the name translates into ‘a thousand leaves’.

Tarte Tatin

Tarte Tatin is like no other apple pie in the whole wide world. Traditionally the filling of apples is caramelized in butter and sugar until brown. It is in fact an upside-down pastry. Hopefully this is enough to satiate the sweet-tooth in you.

Raspberry Charlotte

Visually appealing with an extra knock of raspberry flavor. Yummy goes straight into your tummy!

Paris-Brest

Paris–Brest–Paris is a cycling event like Tour De France. To keep the memory alive of the event, in 1910, the pastry was named ‘Paris Brest’ to acknowledge the mark of the event. A sweet treat which is definitely a must-eat in Paris.


The Best Bistros in Paris

Landon Nordeman

Allard

Established in 1931, Allard remains one of the city’s most beloved old-guard bistros, and for good reason. Dishes like escargots in parsley butter, house foie gras terrine, and roast duck with olives are top-notch.

Allard

Recipe cards at the restaurant almost as old as the establishment itself.

Allard

41 rue St-Andre des Arts, 6th arrondissement (33/1/4326-4823). Expensive.

Aux Lyonnais

Since taking over this famous old bistro in 2002, Alain Ducasse has artfully updated the menu while preserving the soul of the bistro.

Aux Lyonnais

A waiter serves braised veal breast with artichokes.

Aux Lyonnais

32 rue St-Marc, 2nd arrondissement (33/1/4296-6504). Moderate.

Chez Georges

Time stands still at this century-old bistro in the heart of Paris, which serves classics like blanquette de veau (veal breast served with a lemony cream sauce), chicken liver terrine, and wonderful cream puffs with hot chocolate sauce.

Chez Georges

Pan-fried steak with mustard cream sauce.

Chez Georges

1 rue du Mail, 2nd arrondissement (33/1/4260-0711). Moderate.

L’Ami Louis

Come to this temple of classic bistro cuisine for generous portions of garlicky, crunchy potato galette, grilled veal kidneys, whole roast chicken with heaps of frites, and tender milk-fed lamb.

L’Ami Louis

L’Ami Louis

32 rue Vertbois, 3rd arrondissement (33/1/4887-7748). Expensive.

Le Bistrot Paul Bert

Chef Thierry Laurent serves some of the best terrine de campagne in Paris at this genial new bistro.

Le Bistrot Paul Bert

A waiter serves sole meuniere.

Le Bistrot Paul Bert

18 rue Paul Bert, 11th arrondissement (33/1/4372-24-01). Moderate.

Frenchie

The brilliant market-menu cooking of chef Gregory Marchand features cosmopolitan dishes like crab-stuffed ravioli with parsley juice and shellfish. 5 rue du Nil, 2nd arrondissement (33/1/4039-9619). Moderate.

L’Ami Jean

Chef Stephane Jego, who worked under bistro wizard Yves Camdeborde, founder of La Regalade, serves market-driven southwestern French and Basque cooking.

L’Ami Jean

27 rue Malar, 7th arrondissement (33/1/4705-8689). Moderate.

La Regalade Saint-Honor&eacute

At this new branch of La Regalade, chef Bruno Doucetes menu has been a phenomenal hit ever since it opened seven months ago. 123 rue St-Honore, 1st arrondissement (33/1/4221-9240). Moderate.

Le Chateaubriand

Aizpitarte’s globally influenced cuisine de vagabonde exhibits stunning imagination, as in dishes like sea bass with red chicory and lemon creme fraiche.

Le Chateaubriand

129 avenue Parmentier, 11th arrondissement (33/1/4357-4595). Moderate

L’Epigramme

This tiny place has been a hit ever since it opened two years ago. 9 rue de l’Eperon, 6th arrondissement (33/1/4441-0009). Moderate.

Jadis

In French, the name of this popular two-year-old bistro means “in times gone by,” a nod from talented young chef Guillaume Delage to France¿s rich culinary heritage. Pictured here, pork belly with lentils and escargots. 208 rue de la Croix-Nivert, 15th arrondissement (33/1/4557-7320). Moderate.

Le Cochon a l’Oreille

In the old market district of Les Halles, a diverse crowd of happy Parisians packs into this 97-year-old bistro’s compact Belle &Eacutepoque dining room to tuck into dishes like confit de canard and stuffed pork with lentils. 15 rue Montmartre, 1st arrondissement (33/1/4236-0756). Moderate.

Chez Michel

Aptly named chef Thierry Breton’s Breton-inspired cooking is reliably delicious, with dishes like kig ha farz (a stew of pork and veal served with buckwheat stuffing).

Chez Michel

The bistro serves one of the best Paris-Brest pastries (a ring of choux pastry filled with hazelnut cream) in town.

Chez Michel

Since it’s one of her favorite restaurants, yes, that gorgeous blonde in the corner at this vintage bistro near the Gare du Nord just might be Catherine Deneuve. 10 rue de Belzunce, 10th arrondissement (33/1/4453-0620). Moderate.

Le Baratin

Le Baratin is a small, crowded bistro in Belleville, one of the last bohemian neighborhoods in Paris.

Le Baratin

It’s a major expedition from the city center, but that hasn’t stopped it from becoming the place where chefs like Joel Robuchon and Yves Camdeborde come for a night-off feast of chef Raquel Carena’s fabulous home-style cooking.

Le Baratin

The daily-changing menu ranges from oxtail braised with citrus fruits to ragout of cod and shrimp with saffron. 3 rue Jouye-Rouve, 20th arrondissement (33/1/4349-3970). Inexpensive.

La Fontaine de Mars

This popular, well-mannered bourgeois bistro with lace curtains, red-checked tablecloths, and wry but polite waiters always gets it just right, with a superb roster of good old-fashioned Gallic food. 129 rue St-Dominique, 7th arrondissement (33/1/4705-4644). Moderate.

Chez Denise

5 rue des Prouvaires, 1st arrondissement (33/1/4236-2182). Moderate.

Chez Denise

Boisterous, friendly, and completely Parisian, Chez Denise serves trenchermen’s portions of headcheese, charcuterie, lamb brains (pictured here), and rib steaks with fabulous frites until 5:00 A.M.

L’Ecailler du Bistrot

Sister restaurant to Le Bistrot Paul Bert, this may be the best seafood-oriented bistro in Paris, with impeccable fish at reasonable prices. 22 rue Paul Bert, 11th arrondissement (33/1/4372-7677). Moderate.

Where to Stay in Paris

Hotel Bel-Ami 7-11 rue St-Benoi t — 75006 Paris Phone: 33 1 42 61 53 53 http://www.hotel-bel-ami.com
Marriott Renaissance Arc de Triomphe 39 Avenue de Wagram — 75017 Paris 33 1 5537 5537
Four Seasons Hotel George V Paris 31, avenue George V, 75008 Paris, France Tel. 33 (0) 1 49 52 70 00 Not pictured: Afaria, Auberge Pyrenees Cevennes, and Chez Dumonet/Josephine. See the full list of Paris Bistros Landon Nordeman

Don’t leave Paris without trying…

1. Steak frites

The simple pairing of a grilled steak with various optional sauces and chips is elevated to serious heights when the meat is well selected and carefully matured, and the potatoes are fresh, hand-cut and double-fried. Choose your cut of beef, your ‘cuisson’ (order ‘à point’ for medium-rare) and a sauce, be it Béarnaise or peppercorn, and crunch those crispy frites with a side order of squeaky haricots verts.

Try making your own classic French steak with pommes frites with our easy recipe.

2. A cocktail at the Bar Hemingway

The city’s most famous bar is tucked away inside The Ritz and celebrates the life and work of its most famous barfly, Ernest Hemingway. Try a sublime cocktail mixed by legendary British barman Colin Field, who has run the bar since 1994.

His two signature cocktails are the Serendipity, which mixes calvados with fresh mint, sugar, ice and champagne, and the Clean Dirty Martini, which features a frozen cube of olive juice at its centre. You’ll have to guess the other ingredients – Field says he is taking the recipe to his grave.

3. Macarons

Hermé took these colourful treats to another level with flavours such as lemon, orange blossom and Corsican honey (this is called the Jardin de l’Atlas) and rose, lychee and raspberry (the Ispahan). For those who like one flavour only, his ‘Infiniment’ range takes one ingredient – lemon, chocolate, coffee and many others – and uses it to create different layers of flavour in one macaron. Macarons are two-bite delights, but it is worth seeking them out from reputable pastry shops that actually make their own – many just hop on the bandwagon and sell factory-made ones that aren’t worth your time or dime – and go easy on the rainbow-style food colourings.

4. Israeli food

The French aren’t known for embracing the cuisine of other cultures, but Paris is currenlty undergoing a gastronomic revolution and the focus of many chefs is Israeli food. One of the hottest tables in town is at Balagan where chefs Assaf Granit and Dan Yosha and their team are serving fresh, vibrant vegetable, fish and meat dishes lifted with perfectly pitched spices, tahini and citrus.

For the best seat in the house, grab a stool at the kitchen counter and enjoy the chefs’ theatrics as they serve dishes, sing and knock back shots of cucumber and mint-enhanced absinthe.

5. Choucroute

This brasserie staple originally hails from Alsace, the border region in eastern France, but it came to the French capital at the end of the 19th century when the region was annexed by Germany and refugees fled to Paris. Choucroute is the French word for sauerkraut, a huge serving of white cabbage cooked in riesling, duck or pork fat, with herbs and garlic and topped with sausages and pork knuckle.

It’s the perfect dish to share between two, and at Bofinger (which boasts stunning art nouveau décor and a glorious stained glass atrium) it’s served on a heated stove so it stays warm as you work your way through it.

6. Cédric Grolet’s Patisserie

Is it really an orange? As you slice into its shell, you soon realise patissier Cédric Grolet’s extraordinary desserts are something very special – this is actually mousse filled with mandarin and timut pepper compote. At just 32 years old, Grolet has established a worldwide following (mostly thanks to his Instagram account) for his fruit desserts, which look every bit like the real thing.

Each one takes around a week to complete, from the outer shell made with cocoa butter, to the mousse and compote inside. Grolet and his team make around 200 a day, serving only the best to teatime guests at Le Meurice, a luxury hotel on the Rue de Rivoli.

7. A baguette

8. Jacques Genin chocolates

9. Coffee (or tea)

It’s not all about the flat whites and latte art, however. Tea (or thé) predates the coffee trend, with elegant salons de thé attracting a well-heeled clientele to try such brands as Mariage Frères or Dammann Frères – but before you come over all English, these are consumed without milk. One of the most elegant and popular salons de thé is Angelina on the Rue de Rivoli, where tea and coffee should come with their signature patisserie, Le Mont Blanc.

10. Rhum baba

This dense cake with rum and vanilla cream dates from the 18th century and owes its place in French culinary history to King Stanislaus of Poland, who was exiled in Lorraine. The king had fond memories of raisin brioches served with Tokaji wine and so charged his chef, Nicolas Stohrer, with the task of recreating the dish, which he named rhum baba in keeping with his passion for the Arabian Nights stories.

When Stanislaus’ daughter Marie married King Louis XV, Stohrer relocated to Paris and opened his own bakery, and the rhum baba’s Parisian future was sealed. Chef Alain Ducasse adores the dessert and it’s a signature dish in many of his Parisian restaurants.

11. Croque-monsieur

12. Duck confit

13. Jambon-beurre

Like all city dwellers, Parisians often need to eat on the go, and the jambon-beurre is the most Parisian of sandwiches. You can buy it from corner bakeries or order it from the counter at most cafés in both cases it will come as a fresh half-baguette, its insides smeared with cool butter and garnished with ‘jambon de Paris’, a pink-hued cooked ham, with optional cornichons.

14. Raw-milk artisanal cheeses

Paris is truly the gastronomic hub of France, and nowhere is it more apparent than in cheese shops, where you can buy the makings of a cheesy Tour de France and taste your way through each region’s stars, from the mildest to the sharpest. Always favour raw-milk cheeses (unless you have a compromised immunity) and ask the vendor what’s best right now, as the production of artisanal cheeses is a seasonal affair.

15. Croissants

16. Paris-Brest

17. Street-stand crêpes

Clotilde Dusoulier is the French food writer behind Chocolate & Zucchini, a blog that’s all about the fresh, simple, and seasonal foods she cooks in her Paris kitchen.

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